Position: Director
Department: English Language Institute
Campus Address: 350 Ronan Hall
Phone: (989) 774-1717
Email:
fores1rw@cmich.edu


Richard Forest received his Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics from City University of Hong Kong in October of 2007 and his M.A. in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) from Central Michigan University in May of 2002. His research interests include corpus-based linguistics, English for Academic Purposes, and institutional discourses. He has taught English as a Second Language in junior high and elementary schools in Japan, as well as in university EAP and intensive English programs in the United States.

In addition to his current role as Director of the English Language Institute, Dr. Forest is an Associate Professor in CMU’s Department of English Language and Literature, where he teaches text and discourse analysis, grammar and grammar pedagogy, and language teaching methodology.


Courses

In the English Language Institute, Dr. Forest teaches Academic Writing for Graduate Students.


Areas of Expertise

​​​Corpus-based linguistics
English for academic purposes
Institutional discourse


Degrees and Universities

Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics
City University of Hong Kong, October 2007

M.A. in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages)
Central Michigan University, May 2002

B.A. in History & German, with a minor in English
Central Michigan University, May 1999


Professional Organizations

American Association of Applied Linguistics
TESOL
MITESOL


Selected Publications​ ​​

Books

Flowerdew, J. & Forest, R.W. (2015). Signalling nouns in academic English. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK. Cambridge University Press.

 

Journal Articles

Ostling, M. & Forest, R.W. (2014). “Goblins, Owles and Sprites”: Discerning Early Modern English Preternatural Beings through Collocational Analysis. Religion, 44(4), 547-572.

 

Book Chapters

Forest, R.W. & Davis, T.S. (forthcoming). Investigating local sociocultural and institutional contexts for discipline-specific writing. Discipline-specific writing: Theory into practice. London: Routledge.

Flowerdew, J. & Forest, R.W. (2009). Schematic structure and lexico-grammatical realisation in corpus-based genre analysis: The case of ‘research’ in the PhD literature review. In Charles, M., Pecorari, D.& Hunston, S. (Eds.), Academic Writing: At the Interface of Corpus and Discourse, 15-36. London: Continuum.

 

Encyclopedia Articles

Forest, R.W. (2014). Animate objects. The Ashgate Encyclopedia of Literary and Cinematic Monsters.  Weinstock, J. (Ed.). Farnham, Surrey, UK: Ashgate Publishing.

Forest, R.W. (2014). Body parts. The Ashgate Encyclopedia of Literary and Cinematic Monsters.  Weinstock, J. (Ed.). Farnham, Surrey, UK: Ashgate Publishing.

Forest, R.W. (2014). Dungeons & Dragons, monsters in. The Ashgate Encyclopedia of Literary and Cinematic Monsters.  Weinstock, J. (Ed.). Farnham, Surrey, UK: Ashgate Publishing.

Forest, R.W. (2014). Video games, monsters in. The Ashgate Encyclopedia of Literary and Cinematic Monsters.  Weinstock, J. (Ed.). Farnham, Surrey, UK: Ashgate Publishing.

 

Conference Papers

Forest, R.W. (accepted, 2016). ProtAnt and Genre Analysis: Applying a New Tool to an Old Question. International Computer Archive of Modern and Medieval English 2016. May 25-29. Hong Kong, SAR, China.

Fisher, A.M. & Forest, R.W. (2016). The ontogenesis of writing syllabuses. American Association of Applied Linguistics 2016. April 9-12. Orlando, FL.

Fisher, A.M. & Forest, R.W. (2016). The impact of rubric standardization on L2 writing assessment in a university language program. Georgetown University Roundtable on Language and Linguistics 2016. March 11-13. Georgetown, D.C.

Fisher, A.M. & Forest, R.W. (2015). Using test specifications to develop rubrics for L2 writing assessment at the university level. MITESOL Conference. October 9-10. East Lansing, MI.

Davis, T.S., Devenney, A.D., Dobson, L., & Forest, R.W. (2015). Cotexts, contexts, and interpretation: Corpora and “the Viking Age.” Corpus Linguistics 2015. July 21-24. Lancaster, UK.

Forest, R. (2014). The role of discipline-specific writing in undergraduate education. The Summer Institute for Creative and Discovery-based Approaches to University Undergraduate Discipline-specific Writing Programmes. May 28-31. Hong Kong, China.

Erickson, D., Forest, R., Sponberg, E., Valais, T., & Zwier, L. (2014). Vocabulary panel discussion. National Geographic Learning & Michigan State University Learning Symposium: The World in Words: Teaching and Learning Academic Vocabulary. April 12. East Lansing, MI.

Davis, T.S. & Forest, R.W. (2014). Why the slow turn toward discipline specificity in EAP programs isn’t a bad thing. American Association of Applied Linguistics. March 22-25. Portland, OR, USA.