• ​Position: Associate Professor
  • Department: English Language & Literature
  • Campus Address: Anspach 301A
  • Email: fores1rw@cmich.edu

Education

Ph.D., Applied Linguistics, City University of Hong Kong, 2007
M.A., TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages), Central Michigan University, 2002
B.A., History, German, Central Michigan University, 1999

​​​Reasearch Interests

Corpus-based linguistics
Discourse analysis
English for academic purposes​

​Teaching

ENG 101: Freshman Composition
ENG 175: The Nature of Language
ENG 201: Intermediate Composition
ENG 271: Modern Grammar
ENG 371: Pedagogic Grammar
ENG 571: TESOL Methodology
ENG 573: Linguistics and Reading
ENG 574: TESOL: Materials, Assessment, Curriculum
ENG 672: Applied Linguistics for Written Communication
ENG 675: Seminar in English Linguistics (Corpus-based Linguistics)
ENG 675: Seminar in English Linguistics (Discourse Analysis)
ENG 690: Practicum in TESOL
ELI 094: Academic Writing for Graduate Students​​

Selected Publications

​​​Books

Flowerdew, J. & Forest, R.W. (2015). Signalling nouns in academic English. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, UK. Cambridge University Press.


Journal Articles

Ostling, M. & Forest, R.W. (2014). "Goblins, Owles and Sprites": Discerning Early Modern English Preternatural Beings through Collocational Analysis. Religion, 44(4), 547-572.​


Book Chapters

Forest, R.W. & Davis, T.S. (forthcoming). Investigating local sociocultural and institutional contexts for discipline-specific writing. Discipline-specific writing: Theory into practice. London: Routledge.

Flowerdew, J. & Forest, R.W. (2009). Schematic structure and lexico-grammatical realisation in corpus-based genre analysis: The case of 'research' in the PhD literature review. In Charles, M., Pecorari, D.& Hunston, S. (Eds.), Academic Writing: At the Interface of Corpus and Discourse, 15-36. London: Continuum.


Encyclopedia Articles

Forest, R.W. (2014). Animate objects. The Ashgate Encyclopedia of Literary and Cinematic Monsters.  Weinstock, J. (Ed.). Farnham, Surrey, UK: Ashgate Publishing.

Forest, R.W. (2014). Body parts. The Ashgate Encyclopedia of Literary and Cinematic Monsters.  Weinstock, J. (Ed.). Farnham, Surrey, UK: Ashgate Publishing.

Forest, R.W. (2014). Dungeons & Dragons, monsters in. The Ashgate Encyclopedia of Literary and Cinematic Monsters.  Weinstock, J. (Ed.). Farnham, Surrey, UK: Ashgate Publishing.

Forest, R.W. (2014). Video games, monsters in. The Ashgate Encyclopedia of Literary and Cinematic Monsters.  Weinstock, J. (Ed.). Farnham, Surrey, UK: Ashgate Publishing.


Conference Papers

Forest, R.W. (accepted, 2016). ProtAnt and Genre Analysis: Applying a New Tool to an Old Question. International Computer Archive of Modern and Medieval English 2016. May 25-29. Hong Kong, SAR, China.

Fisher, A.M. & Forest, R.W. (2016). The ontogenesis of writing syllabuses. American Association of Applied Linguistics 2016. April 9-12. Orlando, FL.

Fisher, A.M. & Forest, R.W. (2016). The impact of rubric standardization on L2 writing assessment in a university language program. Georgetown University Roundtable on Language and Linguistics 2016. March 11-13. Georgetown, D.C.

Fisher, A.M. & Forest, R.W. (2015). Using test specifications to develop rubrics for L2 writing assessment at the university level. MITESOL Conference. October 9-10. East Lansing, MI.

Davis, T.S., Devenney, A.D., Dobson, L., & Forest, R.W. (2015). Cotexts, contexts, and interpretation: Corpora and "the Viking Age." Corpus Linguistics 2015. July 21-24. Lancaster, UK.

Forest, R. (2014). The role of discipline-specific writing in undergraduate education. The Summer Institute for Creative and Discovery-based Approaches to University Undergraduate Discipline-specific Writing Programmes. May 28-31. Hong Kong, China.

Erickson, D., Forest, R., Sponberg, E., Valais, T., & Zwier, L. (2014). Vocabulary panel discussion.National Geographic Learning & Michigan State University Learning Symposium: The World in Words: Teaching and Learning Academic Vocabulary. April 12. East Lansing, MI.

Davis, T.S. & Forest, R.W. (2014). Why the slow turn toward discipline specificity in EAP programs isn't a bad thing. American Association of Applied Linguistics. March 22-25. Portland, OR, USA.