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U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow tours the Central Michigan University neuroscience facilities with Dr. Gary Dunbar.

Senator Stabenow tours neuroscience labs

October 13, 2014

U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow visited the Central Michigan University neuroscience laboratories today to learn about major breakthroughs in the animal research being conducted here and to congratulate the neuroscience program on being named the 2013 Undergraduate Program of the Year by the Society for Neuroscience, the world’s largest organization of scientists and physicians devoted to understanding the brain and nervous system. 

CMU’s neuroscience program integrates the academic disciplines of biology, chemistry, rehabilitation and medical sciences, and psychology. The laboratories are located in the Health Professions Building. 

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CMU's neuroscience program named top in nation

November 11, 2013

Central Michigan University's undergraduate neuroscience program has been selected as the 2013 Undergraduate Program of the Year by the Society for Neuroscience, the world’s largest organization of scientists and physicians devoted to understanding the brain and nervous system.

The award recognizes the accomplishments of a neuroscience department or program for excellence in educating neuroscientists and providing an innovative model other programs can follow. The award was presented at the Society for Neuroscience’s annual meeting on Nov. 10 in San Diego.

CMU’s undergraduate program is very deserving of this award, says Gary Dunbar, director of the neuroscience program.

“This award speaks highly of our program,” said Dunbar.  “Our collective efforts of more than 30 years have been recognized by the international neuroscience community.”

Award recipients are selected for excellence in teaching and positively influencing the lives and careers of their students.

Dunbar works with a team of approximately 50 undergraduate and graduate students every year in CMU’s neuroscience research program. Many of Dunbar’s students receive state and national recognition for their work in the field.

“Research is a critical part of the education we provide, and a lot of young students in our program take advantage of it,” Dunbar said. “I think that’s what we offer that undergraduates can’t get as readily at other major research universities. We’re very proud of integrating students into research.”

In the last five years, CMU students have won nine out of 10 of the awards given to Michigan’s outstanding undergraduate neuroscientists from the Society for Neuroscience. Earlier this year, CMU graduate student Kyle Fink from Lovell, Wyo., received the prestigious Founders Award from the society’s Michigan chapter.

Dunbar and his research team are involved in a new study poised to help reduce cognitive deficits after a stroke. He believes their research may promote recovery from brain damage caused by stroke, traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and Alzheimer’s.



New study at CMU could help reduce cognitive deficits after a stroke

September 23, 2013

 

Gary Dunbar, director of the neuroscience program at Central Michigan University, believes his research team may have taken a step in the right direction toward furthering research to promote the recovery of the brain after damage caused by stroke, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and Alzheimer’s.

Dunbar, who was quoted in a feature by Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, says the method used in his research is innovative to the field.

“Our research uses a relatively new way of assessing cognitive problems after a stroke, a fairly recent technique to create a stroke in a mouse, and it uses adult stem cells to treat the stroke,” Dunbar said. “The combination of those three relatively new techniques combined makes it a fairly interesting and novel study.”

As part of the research, rats are injected in the brain with a hormone that temporarily constricts blood vessels that carry oxygen. By depriving the brain tissue of oxygen, the cells begin to die out, mimicking a stroke. This allows the team to assess cognitive learning problems that follow a stroke, such as memory difficulties.

To treat the stroke, the team injects bone-marrow-derived stem cells into the brain that produce proteins to reduce brain swelling and help damaged cells survive, function better or return to normal function faster.

In evaluating the experiment, Dunbar and his team discovered stroke rats that were injected with stem cells could perform tasks with significantly fewer mistakes than rats with strokes that did not receive the stem cell injections. In fact, Dunbar reports that stem cell-treated stroke rats could perform nearly as well as rats that did not have a stroke.

“The stem cells are producing proteins to help the brain work better,” Dunbar said. “The question we’re asking is if these stem cells can produce proteins to help the brain remember and reduce cognitive deficits. We believe these stem cells can do that.”

Dunbar credits lead author and CMU alumnus Steven Lowrance, ’13, for the success of this project. Dunbar works with a team of approximately 50 students every year in his neuroscience research. Many of Dunbar’s graduate and undergraduate students receive state and national recognition for their work in the field.

“It speaks highly of our program,” Dunbar said. “It’s a critical part of their education and a lot of young students in our program take advantage of it. I think that’s what we offer that undergraduates can’t get as readily at other major research universities. We’re very proud of integrating students into research.”



CMU students win top awards at state neuroscience conference
​CMU has won nine out of 10 undergraduate awards in past five years


June 19, 2013 —

Central Michigan University’s Kyle Fink of Lovell, Wyo. is this year’s recipient of the state’s most coveted award for outstanding neuroscience research by a graduate student. The Michigan Chapter of the Society of Neuroscience honored Fink with the Founders Award.

In addition, seniors Phillip Starski of Goodrich and Tia Hall from Inkster both received top honors for their undergraduate neuroscience research. They competed with 33 other undergraduate neuroscientists from around the state. In the last five years, CMU has won nine out of 10 awards given to Michigan’s outstanding undergraduate neuroscientists.

“This award is a tremendous honor for me,” said Fink. “I am the first awardee from CMU and one of the first outside of UM, MSU or Wayne State to win the award. This truly reflects the growth of the lab and is a validation of the research that is being conducted at CMU.”

Fink’s research involves the use of adult stem cell therapies for Huntington's disease. He has been working with a new type of adult stem cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells, which can be isolated from non-embryonic tissue, such as skin cells, and transformed into any cell in the body, including brain cells. This technology has tremendous potential for diseases associated with aging.

“Kyle, Phil and Tia are great examples of the many outstanding students we have in our neuroscience program who have taken full advantage of the student-centered, cutting-edge research opportunities here at CMU,” said Gary Dunbar, psychology and neuroscience faculty member. “The magnitude of their research has the potential to positively impact treatments for some of the major neurological diseases that affect millions of people throughout the world.”

Starski is exploring stem cells taken from fat tissue. He’s researching whether stem cells taken from fat are as good as stem cells from bone marrow. He has found the cells reduce some of the symptoms of Huntington’s disease in mice.

Hall is researching a possible therapeutic treatment for Alzheimer’s disease using an experimental drug, examining its effectiveness in alleviating some of the symptoms. With no cure or effective treatment for Alzheimer’s, this type of study is crucial in helping scientists better understand the neurodegenerative disorder.

“Receiving an honor of this caliber would not have been possible without the phenomenal undergraduate research experience I received at the Field Neurosciences Research Laboratory at CMU,” said Hall. “The training and support given by my adviser, Gary Dunbar, the graduate students and my peers that aided me in conducting this research project. I couldn't have asked for a better group of people to be surrounded by, doing what I love — research.”