Reid Skeel
  • Position: Clinical Faculty, Director of Clinical Program, CSA Advisor
  • Department: Psychology
  • Campus Address: Sloan Hall 136, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859
  • Email: skeel1rl@cmich.edu
  • Vitae: Curriculum Vitae
 
Bio:​

Dr. Skeel joined the CMU faculty in 2000. Dr. Skeel coordinates The Neuropsychology Clinic at Central Michigan University. His clinical and research interests focus on neuropsychological assessment. His clinical efforts center on providing functional application of neuropsychological assessment. His research interests are focused on examining variables that affect the ecological validity of neuropsychological tests. Examples of specific projects being conducted in his lab include examining the relationship between cognitive functioning and medication adherence, the impact of anxiety on neuropsychological performance, exploring how newer measures of executive functioning & decision making are related to behavior, cognitive effects of CABG surgery, and detection of sub-optimal effort during testing.

Research Interest:

  • Ecological validity of neuropsychological assessment
  • Cognition and medication adherence
  • Influence of affective variables on cognitive performance
  • Decision-making and risk-taking
  • Malingering

Recent Research:

Knoll, A.R., Otani, H., Skeel, R.L., Van Horn, K.R. (In Press). Learning style, judgments of learning, and learning of verbal and visual information. British Journal of Psychology,

Hatfield-Eldred*, M.R., Skeel, R.L., & Reilly, M.P. (2015). Is it random or impulsive responding? The effect of working memory load on decision-making. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 27, 27 – 36. 

Pilarski*, C., Skeel, R.L., & Reilly, M. (2014). Acute effects of nicotine on risky choice among non-smokers. Psychological Record, 64, 151 - 159.

O'Neil*, R.L., Skeel, R.L., & Ustinova, K.I. (2013). Cognitive ability predicts motor learning on a virtual reality game in patients with TBI. NeuroRehabilitation, 33, 667 – 680.

Leininger*, S., & Skeel, R.L. (2012). Cortisol and self-report measures of anxiety as predictors of neuropsychological performance. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 27, 318 – 328.

*Student authors