Terry Libkuman, Ph.D.
Terry Libkuman
Bio:
Terry M. Libkuman received his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology with emphasis in learning and physiological psychology from the University of Oklahoma in 1970.  He has been at CMU since 1970.  He has taught numerous courses including History and Systems, Learning and Memory, Motivation, Statistics, Research Methods, and Sport Psychology.  His current interests include cognitive psychology, sport psychology, and psychology and law.
 
Research Interest:
Early in my career, my interests were concerned with laboratory investigations of human learning and memory, and that interest continues to this day.  However, the nature of the research has changed with more focus on individual differences and motivational processes, particularly arousal.  In the past 8-10 years, I have developed an interest in applications of industrial/organizational psychology principles to sport.  Studies have been completed in football and basketball that were concerned with the prediction of on-the-field performance using coach’s ratings of player characteristics, for example, motor and cognitive abilities and skills.  A study using collegiate baseball players is currently being completed.  I am interested in extending the I/O methodology to validating indices of performance for a particular ability and/or skill within a sport, e.g., putting in golf or jump shooting in basketball.  In the psychology and law area, I am currently involved in research dealing with the development of an instrument to evaluate the performance of attorneys in court.
 
Recent Research:
Kern, R., Libkuman, T. M., & Temple, S. R.  (In Press). Domestic violence and sentencing decisions.   Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

Otani, H., Libkuman, T. M., Widner, R. L. Jr., & Grave, E. I. (2007).  Memory for emotionally arousing material: A comparison of young and older adults. Journal of General Psychology, 134, 23-42

Otani, H., Libkuman, T. M., Widner, R. L. Jr., & Grave, E. (2007).  Memory for emotionally arousing material: A comparison of young and older adults. Journal of General Psychology, 134, 23-42. 

Kern, R., Libkuman, T. M., & Otani, H. (2005)   Emotional stimuli, divided attention, and memory.  Emotion, 5, 408-417..

Bowling, N., Beehr, T., Wagner, S., & Libkuman, T. M.  (2005). Adaptation level theory, opponent process theory, and dispositions:   An integrated approach to the stability of job satisfaction.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 90, 1044-1053. 

Pederson, S. L., Libkuman, T. M., Love, K. G., & Donn, P. D.(2005). Validation of player characteristics for the prediction of collegiate basketball performance.  International Journal of Sport Management, 6(4), 365-387.

Libkuman, T. M., Stabler, C. L. & Otani, H., (2004).  Arousal, valence and memory.  Memory, 12, 237-247.  

Landau, J. D., Libkuman, T. M., & Wildman, Jr., J.C.  (2002).  Mental simulation inflates performance estimates.  Memory & Cognition, 30, 372-379. 

Griffith, J. D., Libkuman, T. M., Dodd, J. D., Shafir, Z., & Dickinson, J.  (2002). The effects of expert testimony and mock juror decision making and memory.  American Journal of Forensic Psychology, 20, 69-80. 

Libkuman, T. M., Otani, H., & Steger, N.  (2002).  Training in timing improves accuracy in golf.  Journal of General Psychology.