Faculty Awards & Highlights

Hope May presents first complete English translation of 1912 book written by Bertha von Suttner.

Hope May publishes English translation of Bertha von Suttner's 1912 essay 'The Barbarization of the Sky'

July 2017

Department of Philosophy and Religion faculty member Hope Elizabeth May published the first complete English translation of the 1912 book The Barbarization of the Sky written by Bertha von Suttner. The book was presented July 4, 2017, in the Historic Reading Room of the Peace Palace, located in The Hague, Netherlands. The presentation was attended by the Ambassador of Austria to The Netherlands, Dr. Phil. Heidemaria Gürer, and the German Vice-Ambassador to The Netherlands, Verena Gräfin von Roedern.

Hope May receives Fulbright U.S. Scholar Grant

May 3, 2017

The Fulbright Program has awarded philosophy professor Hope May a U.S. Scholar Grant to teach at the Graduate Institute of Peace Studies at Kyung Hee University, Korea!

Her project title is "The Virtues of Untold Stories: Peace History of the United States and Korea," and she'll be teaching in Korea from September through December. Congratulations, Dr. May!




​CHSBS announces recipients of Excellence in Teaching Awards

April 12, 2017

Faculty members Leila Ennaili, Department of Foreign Languages, Literatures and Cultures, and Joseph Anderson, Department of Philosophy and Religion, are the 2017 recipients of the CHSBS Excellence in Teaching Awards!

The CHSBS Excellence in Teaching Awards recognize regular (Maroon Award) and fixed-term (Gold Award) faculty members who go above and beyond what is expected in creating exceptional learning opportunities for our students. The recipients are​ selected by the CHSBS Excellence in Teaching Committee, which is composed of the committee chair Dr. Marcy Taylor, Interim Associate Dean, and a representative from each department within the college.

Our recipients are experts in their fields, effective and creative in promoting student learning, inspire students to high achievement and receive high praise from them in return, and are admired advisors and mentors​ to future educators.​ >>Read more


Dean Pamela Gates presents the Maroon CHSBS Excellence in Teaching Award to Leila Ennaili.

Dean Pamela Gates presents the Gold CHSBS Excellence in Teaching Award to Joseph Anderson.



Amanda Jackson

CHSBS student receives Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Grant

April 6, 2017

Central Michigan University senior Amanda Jackson was recently awarded a nationally competitive Fulbright Grant for a teaching assistantship in Mexico. The Fulbright Program grants 1,900 U.S. citizens the opportunity to teach, conduct research and provide expertise abroad for the length of an entire academic year.

Two years ago, Jackson completed a Learning About Mexican Education Through Action education internship at the Tecnologico de Monterrey in Queretaro, Mexico. This experience helped her become more fluent and encouraged her to apply for the grant.

"The Fulbright is an exchange of cultures and learning about one another," Jackson, a Spanish major from Oak Harbor, Washington, said. "This time in Mexico, I'm going as a professional. I'll be teaching English as an assistant in an English-speaking program anywhere from K-12 to college or I could even help English teachers teach English."

While she does not yet know where she is placed, she is looking forward to sharing her U.S. culture and language with her students.

"I felt like I always wanted to be a teacher," she said. "When I came to CMU, the Spanish education program piqued my interest and the culture of Mexico inspired me to learn the language. I have so much praise for the world language department at CMU."

Earning a Fulbright

Maureen Harke, the coordinator of the National Scholarship Program at CMU, says the Fulbright Program is not limited to any specific fields and operates in more than 140 countries. 

"Fulbright is for students who have an appreciation for cultural differences," Harke said. "The focus of the program is to build mutual understanding between people in the United States and people of other countries." 

The National Scholarship Program at CMU nominates students to compete for nationally and internationally prestigious awards such as the Fulbright U.S. Student Grants. A campus committee interviews applicants to assess their fit with the proposed country and grant, and provides a written evaluation which is included in the students' applications, Harke said. Recipients are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement, as well as record of service and demonstrated leadership in their respective fields.


 

CHSBS faculty receive teaching awards

CHSBS faculty honored for teaching and service

Awards highlight leadership, inspiration in the classroom
March 22, 2017

Several CHSBS faculty members were honored for their commitment to students and creativity in teaching. 

Provost's Award for Outstanding Research and Creative Activity

Kelly Murphy, Department of Philosophy and Religion
The Provost's Award recognizes the excellent scholarship, creativity and promise of faculty members who are in the early stages of his or her academic career. Kelly Murphy is an exceptionally creative scholar whose research focuses on Hebrew, Jewish and biblical studies, specifically ancient Israelite religion and early Judaism. Her work has been widely published in notable publications, including The Washington Post and Religion Dispatches, and she has a forthcoming book being published by the Oxford University Press. 

Excellence in Teaching Awards

The Central Michigan University Excellence in Teaching Awards were created by Academic Senate to provide special recognition to faculty members who exceed the usual standards and expectations.

Brittany Bayless Fremion, Department of History
Brittany Bayless Fremion views teaching as an important and unique form of activism. Her goal is to "inspire students to create proactive, passionate and informed responses to the many issues influencing their lives, making her courses valuable not only on paper, but beyond the walls of the classroom."

Kelly J. Murphy, Department of Philosophy and Religion
Kelly Murphy seeks to inspire students to learn, to strive for excellence, and to make connections between course content and everyday life.

Kyle C. Scherr, Department of Psychology
Kyle Scherr teaches with three main principles: communication, community and diversity. One student said, "Dr. Scherr renewed my enthusiasm for my research, helped me rebuild my confidence in attaining my goals, but maybe more importantly, he renewed my faith in the process and value of my advanced degree."

Pictured, from left to right: Kelly Murphy, Brittany Fremion, and Kyle Scherr.

Kelly Murphy
Brittany Fremion
Kyle Scherr
















​Political Science student Donovan Watts receives 2017-2018 APSA Minority Fellowship

January 5, 2017

Press release from the APSA:
Donovan WattsThe American Political Science Association (APSA) is pleased to announce that Donovan A. Watts, an undergraduate student at Central Michigan University, has been named as a 2017-2018 APSA Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) Fellow

Donovan A. Watts is a senior political science major at Central Michigan University. Donovan’s undergraduate career is highlighted by a number of accomplishments. He has received numerous scholarships and is the current president of the Pi Sigma Alpha chapter at Central Michigan University. As a McNair Scholar, Donovan’s research focused on the knowledge and attitudes of Central Michigan’s Africa​n American students based on the recent conflict between law enforcement officers and African Americans. Donovan’s research interests include   American Politics with a concentration on race and ethnic politics and political participation. Donovan plans on exploring voter turnout of African American millennials and emerging social movements such as the Black Lives Matters Movement. Donovan has a passion for research and teaching and he hopes to use his doctoral degree to influence policy decisions that will have an impact within the African American community.

The MFP was established in 1969 to increase the number of under-represented scholars in the political science discipline. Since 1969, the APSA Minority Fellowship has designated more than 500 Fellows, both funded and unfunded, and contributed to the completion of doctoral political science programs for over 100 individuals. Fall fellows are college or university seniors, graduates, or Master's students who plan on applying to a PhD program in political science. Spring fellows are first and second year PhD students in political science. APSA Minority Fellows are very active in the discipline as faculty members, researchers, and mentors. 

Visit www.apsanet.org/mfp to learn more about the APSA MFP program and recent fellows.