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Section 3: Academic Program, Performance, and Promotion

Section 3: Academic Program, Performance, and Promotion

 

Introduction to the Office of Medical Education

Medical Education Staff

CMED Course Schedule (2013 Matriculating Class)

Course Descriptions Years 1 & 2

                  MED 600: Society and Community Medicine

                  MED 610: Essentials of Clinical Skills

                  MED 620: The Art of Medicine

                  MED 630: Foundational Sciences of Medicine

MED 640: Reproductive/Human Development: Wellness and Disease

                  MED 650: Cardiopulmonary: Wellness and Disease

                  MED 660: Renal/Endocrine: Wellness and Disease

MED 740: Neurosciences/Behavior: Welness and Disease

MED 750: Musculoskeletal/Dermal: Welness and Disease

                  MED 760: Gastrointestinal: Wellness and Disease

MED 770: Hematology/Oncology: Welness and Disease

                  MED 780: Synapse

Requirements for MD Degree

Degree Completion Time

Deferment Policy

Committee on Student Performance and Conduct

Membership

Operating Procedures

Student Assessment Regulations for Years I and II

1.0 Introduction

2.0 Guiding Principles of Assessment

3.0 Assessment Practices and Procedures

4.0 Grading System

5.0 Review of a Course Grade

6.0 Class Attendance, Assignments, and Examinations

Student Promotion, Review, and Remediation Policy

1.0 Introduction

2.0 Monitoring Student Performance

3.0 Promotion from One Academic Year to the Next

4.0 Monitoring Student Conduct

5.0 Review of Student Promotion and Conduct Committee Decisions

6.0 Graduation

Good Academic Standing

Deceleration/Extended Academic Program

Leaves of Absence

Voluntary Leave of Absence

Involuntary Leave of Absence

Voluntary Withdrawal

Involuntary Withdrawal

Accommodations in Assessment(s) for Students with Disabilities Policy

Academic Records

Maintaining and Dissemination of Student Records

Access to Records

Review

Introduction to the Office of Medical Education

The Office of Medical Education is responsible for the oversight of development, organization, and implementation of medical student activities.  Among these are class scheduling, evaluation and assessment of students and the education program.  The office manages the day-to-day administration of the curriculum, the committees, and the individuals responsible for supporting student learning activities.

 

Students are welcome to make appointments and to drop into the office with questions and suggestions or just to learn more about the CMED learning experience.

Medical Education Staff

Associate Dean of Medical Education

Linda Perkowski, Ph.D.

 

Senior Associate Dean of Educational Programs

Joel H. Lanphear, Ph.D.

 

Associate Dean of Clinical Education and Hospital Relations

Sean K. Kesterson, M.D., FACP

 

Instructional Developer

Ireta Ekstrom, Ph.D.

 

Director for Educator Development Programs

Jean Bailey

 

Coordinator of Student Performance and Assistance

Amy Faber

 

Assistant Dean for Educational Research, Evaluations, and Outcomes

To be determined

 

Clinical Education Coordinator

Janet Gabel

CMED Course Schedule (2013) Matriculating Class

YEAR I

 

 

 

Course

Start Date

End Date

#  weeks

ORIENTATION

8/5/2013

8/9/2013

1

MED 630: FOUNDATIONAL SCIENCES OF MEDICINE
(with 1st C.A.R.E.S. week at course mid-point - Week 10)

8/12/2013

12/6/2013

16

C.A.R.E.S. WEEK

12/9/2013

12/13/2013

1

WINTER BREAK

12/16/2013

1/3/2014

3

TRANSITION WEEK

1/6/2014

1/10/2014

1

MED 640: REPRODUCTIVE/HUMAN DEVELOPMENT: WELLNESS AND DISEASE

1/13/2014

2/21/2014

6

C.A.R.E.S. WEEK

2/24/2014

2/28/2014

1

SPRING BREAK

3/3/2014

3/7/2014

1

MED 650: CARDIOPULMONARY: WELLNESS AND DISEASE

3/10/2014

5/2/2014

8

C.A.R.E.S. WEEK

5/5/2014

5/9/2014

1

MED 660: RENAL/ENDOCRINE: WELLNESS AND DISEASE

5/12/2014

7/4/2014

8

C.A.R.E.S. WEEK

7/7/2014

7/11/2014

1

*MED 600: SOCIETY AND COMMUNITY MEDICINE

8/5/2013

7/11/2014

*

*MED 610: ESSENTIALS OF CLINICAL SKILLS

8/5/2013

7/11/2014

*

*MED 620: THE ART OF MEDICINE

8/5/2013

7/11/2014

*

SUMMER BREAK

7/14/2014

8/22/2014

6

TOTAL WEEKS YEAR I

 

 

45

YEAR II

 

 

 

MED 740: NEUROSCIENCES/BEHAVIOR: WELLNESS AND DISEASE

8/25/2014

10/17/2014

8

C.A.R.E.S. WEEK

10/20/2014

10/24/2014

1

MED 750: MUSCULOSKELETAL/DERMAL: WELLNESS AND DISEASE

10/27/2014

12/5/2014

6

C.A.R.E.S. WEEK

12/8/2014

12/12/2014

1

WINTER BREAK

12/15/2014

1/2/2015

3

MED 760: GASTROINTESTINAL: WELLNESS AND DISEASE

1/5/2015

2/13/2015

6

C.A.R.E.S. WEEK

2/16/2015

2/20/2015

1

SPRING BREAK

2/23/2015

2/27/2015

1

MED 770: HEMATOLOGY/ONCOLOGY: WELLNESS AND DISEASE

3/2/2015

4/10/2015

6

C.A.R.E.S. WEEK

4/13/2015

4/17/2015

1

MED 780: S.Y.N.A.P.S.E.

4/20/2015

5/15/2015

4

*MED 600: SOCIETY AND COMMUNITY MEDICINE

8/25/2014

4/17/2015

*

*MED 610: ESSENTIALS OF CLINICAL SKILLS

8/25/2014

4/17/2015

*

*MED 620: THE ART OF MEDICINE

8/25/2014

4/17/2015

*

SUMMER BREAK

5/18/2015

7/3/2015

7

*MED 600, 610, AND 620 ARE LONGITUDINAL COURSES INTEGRATED THROUGHOUT YEARS I & II

TOTAL WEEKS YEAR II

 

 

34

Course Description for Years 1 & 2

MED 600: Society and Community Medicine

Integrates population and public health concepts with individual and community needs, health, and healthcare access, providing essential context for ethical, cultural, legal and organizational concepts.      

MED 610: Essentials of Clinical Skills

An integrated clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic skill development course.  Emphasis is placed on history-taking, physical examination, and diagnostic skills presented by body system.

MED 620: The Art Of Medicine

Explores foundational elements of professionalism, ethics, humanities and self-care in the medical profession.

MED 630: Foundational Sciences of Medicine

Builds a knowledge base of the basic science mechanisms underlying wellness and disease that are presented in subsequent courses.

MED 640: Reproductive/Human Development: Wellness and Disease

Provides the basic and clinical sciences knowledge and learning experiences required to understand wellness and disease mechanisms for the human development and reproductive system.

MED 650: Cardiopulmonary: Wellness and Disease

Develops the basic and clinical sciences knowledge base required for understanding mechanisms underlying wellness and diseases of the cardiopulmonary system.

MED 660: Renal/Endocrine: Wellness and Disease

Develops the basic and clinical sciences knowledge base required for understanding mechanisms underlying wellness and diseases of renal and endocrine systems.

MED 740: Neurosciences/Behavior: Wellness and Disease

Provides instruction on the basic structure and function of the nervous system and a clinical foundation required for examination and treatment of its disorders.

MED 750: Musculoskeletal/Dermal: Wellness and Disease

Develops the basic and clinical sciences knowledge base required for understanding mechanisms underlying wellness and diseases of the musculoskeletal and dermal systems.

MED 760: Gastrointestinal: Wellness and Disease

Provides the basic and clinical sciences knowledge and learning experiences required to understand wellness and disease mechanisms for the gastrointestinal system. 

MED 770: Hematology/Oncology: Wellness and Disease

Develops the basic and clinical sciences knowledge base required for understanding mechanisms underlying wellness and diseases of the hematologic system.

MED 780: Synapse

A course providing a review of curriculum to date and a transition to the clinical experiences in the third and fourth years.

Requirements for MD Degree


Students need to complete all required course and clinical work for Years 1 through 4 as outlined in the handbook and the CMED website (Years 3 and 4 TBA). This includes remaining in good academic standing as defined later in this section as well as complying with stated compliance requirements announced in this handbook. Students are responsible for keeping abreast of updates to the handbook and website. Any changes affecting requirements will be made known to students via several lines of communication, including updates through the Offices of Medical Education and Student Affairs, the CMED website, and student CMU email accounts.

 

Degree Completion Time

The standard and preferred time for medical school completion is four academic years. Certain extenuating circumstances may increase this time, however. The maximum time allowed is six academic years. Years 1 and 2 must be completed within three years and Years 3 and 4 must also be completed in three years.

Possible reasons for extension may include remediation, leave of absence, or rarely, a deceleration or reduced academic program. The Student Performance and Conduct Committee (SPCC) will have oversight of any extension of degree completion time. If the student does not complete the program requirements in six academic years, the SPCC will review the student's record and may request the student withdraw from the program.

 

Deferment Policy

An accepted student may opt to defer their first year. The student must submit a letter to the Office of Admissions stating the reason for deferment. Each request will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the admissions committee with final review by the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs. Requests are granted for only one academic year at a time. Requests for an additional academic year deferment will only be granted in extenuating circumstances. No deferments beyond a total of two academic years will be granted.

Committee on Student Performance and Conduct

The SPCC is the committee of the faculty established to monitor student progress in both areas—academic performance and conduct.

 

The SPCC shall be responsible to quarterly and annually review the academic performance of all students.  The committee shall also be responsible for the review of student conduct. The purview of the committee includes but is not limited to:

    Poor academic performance and failure to achieve a grade of "Pass"

    Unprofessional conduct

    Behavior that may jeopardize the safety or well-being of any patient or others

    Demonstration of any unethical or illegal behavior or activity

    Violation of the all Codes, Standards, and Compact as outlined in Section Two of the CMED Student Handbook: Standards, Conduct, and Professionalism.

 

The SPCC shall recommend to the dean, via the Executive Committee, student promotion, candidate receipt of the MD degree, and disciplinary action related to its purview which may include suspension/involuntary leave of absence, censures, and dismissal/recommendation of withdrawal.

Membership

The SPCC shall be composed of twenty (20) members. Fourteen (14) members are voting members. The voting membership includes four (4) executive faculty members elected from the foundational sciences discipline and two (2) each from the medical and surgical disciplines. Each executive faculty member serves a four-year term. Four (4) medical students (one each from M1-M4), are elected annually from the student body for a one-year term. Students may be elected for one succeeding term. One (1) resident physician from the resident group is appointed annually by the dean for a one-year term. A chair is elected from the executive faculty and serves a two-year term and may be elected for a second consecutive two-year term. If a chair is removed by the dean midterm the new chair appointed will serve the remaining term of the elected chair. Ex-officio non-voting members who may attend meetings to serve as resources for the Committee are:

       Assistant Dean for Student Affairs

       Associate Dean of Medical Education

       Registrar or equivalent position

       Senior Associate Director of Financial Aid

       Director of Admissions

       University Representative - Multicultural Affairs

       Director of Student Affairs

Operating Procedures

A quorum of the SPCC will be a simple majority. Matters requiring a vote are considered passed by majority vote. At every meeting of the SPCC the chair, upon calling the committee to order, shall ask each member present if they have a perceived or actual conflict of interest with any matter before the committee. A committee member is considered to have a conflict of interest if they have had a final decision-making role in determining the final grade of a student and may not engage in committee decisions and/or vote on matters regarding the progress and/or promotion of that student. Further, in the event of any other conflict of interest, real or perceived, the conflicted member of the committee will be excused by the chair from the official proceedings of the committee. Conflicts of interest may be of a personal (e.g., friend, mentor, etc.) or academic nature (e.g., an evaluator of the student in question). The student has the right to challenge, by notifying the chair, the presence of individual members of the committee at the meeting. Other procedures necessary to running a committee may also be developed by the committee.

Student Assessment Regulations for Years I and II

1. Introduction

The College of Medicine (CMED) is committed to the education of high-quality physicians and health professionals. It is CMED's responsibility to provide students with the opportunity to achieve this end, to assess student progress, and to provide students with information about their performance based upon reliable and valid assessments of their individual progress. Assessment will be based on institutional competencies which include professional behavior, attitudes, skills and the acquisition and application of content knowledge.

An ideal assessment program is more than a collection of discrete assessment methods, but embodies an effective and comprehensive program that accurately reflects the institution's educational values. It also supports the growth of learners, sets out clear expectations, and enables consistent, transparent decision-making about learner performance.

Since student assessment has a powerful influence in medical education by appraising student knowledge and performance and in driving learning, it is crucial that assessment practices are consistent with CMED's values, educational philosophy, and curriculum principles.

1.1      Subject to the approval of the Executive Committee of the College of Medicine (CMED), the overall policy on assessment and the planning of programs of study leading to the MD degree is the responsibility of the curriculum committee, which is a standing committee (CurrCom) of the Executive committee of CMED.

1.2      A course is defined as any educational experience for which a student receives a grade (course/clerkship/elective) or any educational experience for which student performance is recorded (component of a course or clerkship).

2.0 Guiding Principles of Assessment

The CMED assessment model is based upon a philosophy and a series of guiding principles first articulated in January 2013 and adopted by the Curriculum Committee (CurrCom). These principles include the following:

2.1      Student assessment is primarily for the benefit of student learning, consistent with the principle of learner-centered education;

2.2      Student assessment is performance-based.  As much as possible, assessment modalities are realistic and practice focused, and should reflect the process and context in which learning took place;

2.3      Just as integration is a central principle in the curriculum, so it is in assessment. Students are assessed on their achievement of learning objectives, across the full range of knowledge, skills and attitudes in line with CMED's competencies as well as the medical school's vision, mission and values;

2.4      Assessment and curriculum are not discrete entities.  Assessment objectives are the same as CMED program objectives and are aligned with CMED competencies. The objectives set the target for student learning and performance assessment. CMED will strive to ensure that the assessment of students in the MD program is consistent with curricular goals and educational principles;

2.5      Assessment tools and criteria are explicit, and the methods for determining academic standing will be explicitly documented and disseminated to students;

2.6      Assessments will be criteria-based and students will demonstrate achievement of their learning goals in comparison to those criteria.

2.7      Assessment is comprehensive, with a balance between formative and summative assessment;

2.8      Students will receive timely feedback about their performance;

2.9      The frequency of assessment is sufficient such that faculty and students have a sense of progress towards, and achievement of the required standards;

2.10    The assessment   program   includes   the   development   of   self-   and   peer-assessment, quality assessment, and life-long learning skills;

2.11    Assessment tools, standards, and processes will draw from institutional, national,   and international sources  and  standards,  including the National Board of Medical  Examiners (NBME) and the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME);

2.12    The assessment program and methods will be continuously evaluated to ensure that student assessment is responsive to student needs and consistent with CMED's academic principles;

2.13    The outcome of assessment in Years I and II are Pass/No Pass;

2.14    The assessment program will strive to achieve continuity and consistency in assessment across the entirety of the MD program; and

2.15    The assessment program will endeavor to work with students and faculty to ensure an assessment environment that can accommodate learners with special needs while preserving the academic integrity and fairness of the assessment process.

3.0 Assessment Practices and Procedures

3.1      All assessments must be aligned with the approved learning objectives, consistent with Guiding Principles 2.3, 2.4, and 2.5.  Students are responsible for achieving the learning objectives communicated to them and demonstrating this when assessed.  Thus, assessment practices must test the achievement of learning objectives at the same level of skill, knowledge, or attitude expressed in the approved learning objective.

3.2      For written examinations, the following standards must be met:

3.2.1   All items must pose a clear question, consistent with Guiding Principle 2.5, and contain all of the  information  and  instructions  required  for  a  competent  medical  student  to  answer  the question.

3.2.2   For institutionally developed multiple choice questions, all questions should follow the USMLE/ABMS item writing guidelines.

3.2.3   For other forms of written examinations (such as short answer or essay), questions posed must clearly indicate the allocation of marks, consistent with Guiding Principle 2.6. For example, if a student must provide 4 examples to receive full marks, this must be specified in the question.

3.3      For other assessments (e.g., research papers, presentations, oral examinations, posters, simulations) a grading rubric must be included in the course syllabus to provide students with clear expectations of what is required and how it will be graded.

3.4      The timing and number of assessments is regulated by the Curriculum Committee (CurrCom). All examinations will be listed in the course syllabus at the beginning of each course. Consistent with the guiding principles, the frequency of assessment must be sufficient such that faculty and students have a sense of progress towards, and achievement of, the required standards. To that end:

3.4.1   There shall be two (2) mandatory summative, comprehensive assessments or examinations evaluating student learning for each course. These examinations will be administered at or near the midpoint and at end of each non-longitudinal course.  The Foundational Sciences of Medicine Course will include a comprehensive exam every four weeks.  Exam questions may pertain to any prior learning subject matter. 

3.4.2   Summative, end-of-course examinations will occur during the first part of the CARES weeks. Midterm examinations will occur during regularly scheduled course time. This applies to Foundations and Organ System courses.

3.4.3   Written, summative end-of-course examinations will be no more than 3 hours in length and follow the guidelines governing administration of USMLE examinations. Midterm examinations cannot exceed 2 hours in length. Time allocated to lab based or performance based examinations will be scheduled in consultation with CurrComm.

3.4.4   There will be a formative quiz at the end of each week during the Foundational Sciences of Medicine course in Year 1.  The remaining courses in Years I and II will include IRATs and GRATs in their Team-Based Learning sessions.

3.5      All exam items will be keyed to learning objectives and discipline areas.

4.0 Grading System

4.1      Formative vs. Summative Assessment: Formative assessments are used to monitor learning progress and to provide feedback to students and faculty with respect to learning.  Formative assessment results do not become part of the permanent student record and are not used in decision-making with regard to student progress or promotion, except where formative assessments document repeated concerns regarding professional behavior.   Formative assessment emphasizes the provision of timely, constructive feedback. They may also be used to guide students in obtaining additional learning assistance. Summative assessments are used to determine the extent to which instructional objectives have been achieved, and are recorded as part of the student record. These are used for determining grades and for decision-making with regard to student progress or promotion. They may also be used to guide students in obtaining additional learning assistance.

4.2      Mandatory vs. Optional Assessments:   Instances of assessment may be mandatory or optional. 'Mandatory' indicates that the successful completion of the task is a requirement for promotion or graduation.  'Optional' assessments or activities may be undertaken at the discretion of the learner.

4.3      Program vs. Course Requirements: The undergraduate medical curriculum includes requirements for each course, as well as those that are not associated with the learning objectives of a particular course but are required to be completed satisfactorily in order to meet the Program Requirements.

4.4      Passing Standard:  For all courses that use numeric marks, the passing standard is 70%; Objective Structured Clinical Exam or OSCE stations may define the requirements for a 'competent candidate', which may vary from station to station and exam to exam. These will be determined in advance of the exam.  For Program Requirements that are not given a numeric mark, the expectations for students to achieve a "Pass" will be explicitly defined in advance and communicated to students.

4.5      Determination of Grades:  Grades for each course will be calculated as prescribed in the approved Assessment Plan for each course for that academic year.  Any numeric grade will be rounded to a whole number (up from 0.5 or above, otherwise rounding down) and converted to a final "Pass" or "No Pass" determination for reporting on the academic transcript for the corresponding course code.

4.6      Review of components of a grade:  If a student requests a review of a portion of his/her grade (i.e., items on a test, evaluation of a written assignment, etc.) he/she may speak directly to the Course Director or the faculty member who wrote the item or provided the component grade. Students requesting such a review must do so within 2 working days of taking a test or receiving a component grade. The Course Director or his/her designated faculty member makes the determination on any changes. If the student wishes to appeal the decision, he/she must provide a written request to the Course Director within 24 hours of receiving the decision. If it is an institutionally derived multiple choice exam question, then the Course Director should review the item statistics (e.g., percentage of student who missed the item and percentage choosing alternate answers) and the intent/wording of the question. The Course Director has the discretion then to allow an alternate answer, delete the questions entirely from the exam, or to maintain the original answer. The decision of the Course Director is final and binding. 

5.0 Review of a Course Grade

5.1      A student requesting a review of a grade for a course must initiate the request for review in writing with the Course Director(s) within 2 working days of the posting of the grade. The Course Directors or one or more members of the Course Committee as selected by the Course Directors will meet with the student to hear and respond to any concerns raised by the student. This meeting should take place within 1 week (5 working days) of the student submitting the request in writing. The Course Director shall, at the end of that meeting or within four (4) working days thereafter, advise the student in writing as to their decision concerning the grade of the student for that course.

5.2      If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the Course Directors, the student shall have the right within ten (10) working days of the latest decision of the Course Directors to provide written notice to the Director of Years I and II (Yr. I/II Director) that the student wishes a further reconsideration of this matter.  After receipt of such notice, the Yr. I/II Director will consult with the Course Director and committee, if appropriate.  Within fourteen (14) working days of receipt of such notice from the student, the Yr. I/II Director will hold a meeting with the student to review and discuss the decision of the Course Director.  This meeting will also include dialogue between the student and the Yr. I/II Director concerning the student's fulfillment of the course requirements.  The Yr. I/II Director shall have the right to amend the decision of the Course Director in this regard.  Within four (4) working days of that meeting, the Yr. I/II Director shall provide the student and the Course Director with written notice of the decision of the Yr. I/II Director on the course grade under review and that decision shall be final and binding.

6.0 Class Attendance, Assignments, and Examinations

6.1      Professional attendance: It is required that CMED students attend all small-group sessions, Team-Based Learning Sessions, Problem Based Learning Sessions, Initial Clinical Experiences (ICE), Standardized Patient encounters, simulations, labs, all summative examinations, formative quizzes, longitudinal courses, and all scheduled sessions.  Many sessions are participatory and opportunities for make-up will not be possible. Recurrent missed assignments will be handled on a case-by-case basis. Valid absences are allowed if the student receives approval according to the processes outlined below.

6.2      Personal/family Illness or medical emergencies: In circumstances involving illness or other medically-related issues that prevent a student from attending a class or completing a mandatory assignment or assessment, he or she must inform the Office of Student Affairs by telephone within 24 hours of the scheduled activity/due date. The contact number is (989) 774-7880. Students missing more than 1 day of class due to illness are required to call in each day to the Office of Medical Education as above.  If the student is out for more than 3 days due to illness, the student (or a representative for the student, if the severity of illness requires such) must obtain a Request for Interruption in Student Attendance (RISA) form online or from the Office of the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. This form must be presented to the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs accompanied by a statement from an appropriate licensed health care professional who will be required to indicate that the illness of the student rendered the student incapable of completing the assignment/assessment at the scheduled date and time.  All documentation must be submitted to the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs within 1 week of the missed assignment/assessment (excluding weekends and statutory holidays).  The Assistant Dean of Student Affairs will document in writing that this was a valid absence.  If the required documents are not submitted within the allowable time frame or the absence is not determined to be valid, this will result in an automatic grade of No Pass for the missed assignment/assessment.

           In the event of  emergencies, for example birth, sudden serious illness, or death of an immediate family member, students should initially inform both the Course Director and the Office of the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs of the situation at hand.  Documentation verifying the student's absence must be provided to the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs within 3 weeks of the event.  The Assistant Dean of Student Affairs will document in writing that this was a valid absence.  Timelines may be flexible as the need dictates when extenuating circumstances are present and verifiable.

6.3      Missed examinations: At the beginning of each academic year, each student will receive a copy of the schedule of summative assessments taking place during the academic year. It will be the responsibility of each student to ensure that no conferences, meetings, appointments or other events are scheduled during these examination time periods. If a student misses an examination due to illness/medical emergency, the student should follow the procedure outlined in 6.2 to receive a valid absence. The student will need to arrange any make-up examinations with the course director.  The course director's decision of date and time shall be final.

6.4      Late assignments: Mandatory assignments that are handed in past the deadline may receive a "0"/No Pass for the late assignment.  Students requesting an extension of the deadline for an assignment must make their request in writing or by email, prior to the due date to the Course Director(s) as per the procedure outlines in 6.2.

6.5      Academic events: In circumstances involving individual arrangements for a student to attend academically-relevant events, a request for approval must be directed to the Office of the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs for review and consideration at least 8 weeks in advance of the event using the form available online or from the Office of Student Affairs. The Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, in consultation with any course directors leading course activities affected by the student's absence, will approve or disapprove the request. It is the responsibility of the student to also provide the Office of Medical Education a written notice at least 8 weeks prior to the scheduled event. It is at the discretion of the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs to determine whether an approved absence is granted.  In determining whether an approval will be granted, the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs will take into consideration the ongoing performance of the student, the nature of the event, and the justification provided by the student. The Assistant Dean for Student Affairs will notify the Office of Medical Education and the student of his/her decision at least 4 weeks prior to the scheduled event.

6.6      Adjustment for approved absences: In the case of valid absences as detailed in this document, and depending on the weight of the missed assignment/assessment, the Course Director in consultation with the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, will determine, taking into account the academic performance and academic need of the student, and in a manner consistent with these Regulations, which one of the following options will be exercised:

i)        The student will be given the opportunity to take another comparable examination or assessment, either immediately before the regular assessment or within 10 working days following the end of the missed assessment;

ii)       The student may complete a written assessment as part of the remedial exam cycle if assessments cannot be completed within the 10 day period;

iii)      In the case of other examinations (such as laboratory exams or OSCEs) an oral examination of the material may be chosen.

6.7     All other absences not falling into the categories above, both excused and unexcused, will be tracked by the Office of Student Affairs. The number of these unexcused absences are up to the discretion of the course directors.  Students must also request approval to be excused for these events.  A written request should be turned into the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs and Office of Medical Education at least 8 weeks prior to the event for review and consideration.  The procedure outlined above in 6.5 will be followed.

Student Promotion, Review, and Remediation Policy

1.0 Introduction

1.1    Subject to the approval of the Executive Committee of the College of Medicine (CMED), the overall policy on assessment and the planning of programs of study leading to the MD degree is the responsibility of the Curriculum Committee (CurrCom), which is a standing committee of the Executive committee of CMED.

1.2    The Student Performance and Conduct Committee (the "SPCC"), a standing committee of the Executive Committee of CMED in consultation with the Course Committee, will throughout the academic year monitor the progress of students and, where required, provide guidance and direction for the students to assist them in attaining promotion to the next level of their medical school education. A failure to demonstrate adequate progress at any point in the curriculum may be grounds for a recommendation of remediation or withdrawal from the CMED program.

1.3    A course is defined as any educational experience for which a student receives a grade (course/clerkship/elective).

1.4    The (SPCC) shall be responsible to quarterly and annually review the academic performance of all students.  The committee shall also be responsible for the review of student conduct. The purview of the committee includes but is not limited to:

       Poor academic performance and failure to achieve a grade of "Pass"

       Unprofessional conduct

       Behavior that may jeopardize the safety or well-being of any patient or others

       Demonstration of any unethical or illegal behavior or activity

       Violation of the Codes, Compact, and Responsibilities as outlined in Section Two of the CMED Student Handbook, Standards, Conduct, and Professionalism

 

The SPCC shall recommend to the dean, via the Executive Committee, student promotion, candidate receipt of the MD degree, and disciplinary action related to its purview which may include suspension, censures, and dismissal.

2.0 Monitoring Student Performance

2.1    The course committees, in conjunction with the SPCC, in accordance with CMED policies and procedures, will set standards and expectations for students to pass each course and will communicate them to the students through the Associate Dean of Medical Education at the beginning of each course.  At the end of the academic year, the Course Committees, through the SPCC, shall determine whether a student has passed or failed a course together with any recommendations in respect thereof.

2.2    Each student will be informed by the SPCC in writing as to whether the student has passed or failed the academic year.

2.3    Monitoring Student Progress

2.3.1  Students are expected to successfully complete all components of a course as specified in the assessment plan for each course in order to receive "Pass" for the course.  

2.3.2  When a student has not met the passing standard for one or more assessments, or appears at risk of not achieving a passing standard, the course director will advise the student and may also advise the appropriate responsible individuals so that they may offer appropriate assistance. Such persons may include the Associate Dean for Medical Education, the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs, Site Liaison Clinicians or Site Administrative Coordinators – Year 1 and 2 or Year 3 and 4.  The student shall be advised of any such referrals.

2.3.3  It is the responsibility of the student to consult with the appropriate faculty member(s) or staff regarding any performance concerns or learning difficulties.  These may include the course directors, Student Affairs, or any other faculty members.

2.3.4  For academic support regarding content, students should be in contact with appropriate faculty members.  In Year 1, the first point of contact would be the faculty instructor, facilitator or tutor.  If the student does not know who to contact, they should begin with the Course Director.

2.3.5  Students who require assistance for learning issues, such as study approaches or learning styles, should access the services of CMU resources through the Office of Student Affairs.

2.3.6  Students experiencing personal issues that are interfering with their learning should contact the Office of Student Affairs for support and referral to other resources as appropriate.

2.4    Remediation

Students who do not receive a passing grade in a component of a course or courses may be permitted to undergo remediation. Remediation is defined as a period of self-study for any portion of the Course or Program Requirements of the MD program for which a student does not achieve a passing grade. For remediation to be considered, the student's case will be brought to the SPCC. The SPCC decides if the student is eligible to remediate and will inform the student. Please refer to Section 3.0 in this policy for more details. Students may be required to disclose successful remediation to licensing bodies. In Years 1 and 2, remediation normally occurs during CARES weeks and the summer break. The scheduling of remediation is a negotiated arrangement between the Office of Medical Education and the individual remediating student provided it is necessitated and supported by the Office of Student Affairs.

2.4.1  Eligibility for remediation is not automatic and may be denied by the SPCC. Students may not remediate more than 1 course in a given year.

2.4.2  A "Deferred" (Z) grade will be assigned to the course to be remediated, pending the outcome of remediation.

2.4.3  In Year 1, the student must review and be re-assessed on the course content if he/she receives less than 70% on the final exam of the course. The remediation will normally be held during the summer prior to the start of Year 2.  If the student passes the remediation, they will be recommended for promotion to Year 2.

2.4.3.1  Students who fail remediation will either repeat Year 1 (or a portion thereof) as determined by the Associate Dean of Medical Education on the advice of the SPCC, or may be withdrawn from the program.

2.4.4  For remediation in year 2, students must review and be re-assessed on any course where they received less than 70%. The remediation will normally be held during the CARES week or the break prior to the start of Year 2. If students pass the remediation, they will be recommended for promotion to Year 3.

2.4.4.1  Students who fail the remediation will either repeat Year 2 (or a portion thereof), as determined by the Associate Dean for Medical Education on the advice of the SPCC, or may be withdrawn from the MD program.

2.4.4.2  Students who do not receive a pass in a required elective will receive a 'deferred' grade (Z) designation on the transcript, and must repeat the elective in Year 3; no year 3 credit will be given for this elective.

2.4.5  Students who pass a remediation assessment will receive a passing grade.

3.0 Promotion from One Academic Year to the Next

3.1    The SPCC shall determine if students have met the criteria for promotion.  Students are expected to successfully complete all required components of the Medical Education curriculum for each year in order to be promoted to the next year of the program.  This includes achieving "Pass" (P) for each of the courses, as well as completing all other program requirements satisfactorily.

3.2    Promotion at the End of the Academic Year Including Dismissal

3.2.1  For promotion at the end of the academic year, a student must have:

a)   Completed the course work as described in the current regulations of CMED for the year of the program and passed all prescribed academic assessments;

b)   Exhibited a strong sense of professionalism in personal conduct in relationships with peers, patients, hospital personnel, faculty and staff; and

c)   To begin the Comprehensive Community Clerkship (CCC), the student must have taken and recorded a score for the USMLE Part 1. If the student fails Step 1 at this time, he/she will be allowed to take the CCC but must pass Step 1 prior to taking any future clerkships.

 

3.2.2  The SPCC will determine if a student has met the requirements for promotion and will recommend their action to the Executive Committee. In doing so, the SPCC may take into consideration the following:

a)   Summative assessments for the students;

b)   Input from faculty members;

c)   Marks obtained by the student in the course work (a Pass 'P' for each course);

d)   Evaluation from hospital supervisors and health care providers, if involved in the course of learning;

e)   Recommendations of the Course Committee;

f)    Information deemed relevant concerning the personal conduct and professionalism of the student; and

g)   Such other information as the SPCC deems relevant.

 

3.2.3      As soon as possible after the end of the academic year and after approval by the Executive Committee, the SPCC will inform the student in writing of its decision as to whether the student has met the requirements for promotion and, if the decision is that the student has failed to do so, then the SPCC shall also confirm to the student one of the following:

a)   For promotion, the student must successfully complete the required remediation (as described below);

b)   For promotion, the student must successfully repeat the academic year; or

c)   The student must withdraw from the program as determined by the Executive Committee.

 

3.2.4  Students not meeting the promotion criteria must complete remediation requirements before being reviewed again for promotion.  As per 2.4.1, eligibility for remediation is not automatic and may be denied by the SPCC.

3.2.5  A student who fails to meet the standards of professional behavior as set out in the Student Handbook, Section Two: Standards, Conduct, and Professionalism, may be  withdrawn  from  the  program  even  though  all  other  program  requirements  are  met. Guidelines and policies for dealing with inappropriate or unprofessional behavior are defined in Part 1.3 of this document and under "Student Misconduct" in Section Two of this handbook.  This includes personal conduct and relationships with peers, patients, hospital personnel, faculty, and staff.

3.2.6  In cases where students have not successfully completed all course and program requirements, the SPCC shall determine whether the student will carry out remediation, repeat the year or portion thereof, or be withdrawn from the program.

3.2.7  In the subsequent year after remediation, if a student fails a course they will not be eligible to remediate again. The student will be required by the SPCC to repeat the year or withdraw from the MD program.

3.2.8  If a student fails more than one course in four years, regardless of remediation, the student will have to go before the SPCC for a determination as to whether the student will be allowed to continue with the program.

3.3    Students  in  the CCC  will  be  granted  provisional  promotion  to  Year 4  until  their  individual assessments  are  officially  reviewed  by  the  Course  Committees  and  the  SPCC.    If at that time students are identified who did not complete all course and program requirements successfully, they must remediate.

3.4    Where a student has received notice from the SPCC that the student has failed to meet the requirements for promotion, the student shall have the right to meet with the Associate Dean of Medical Education and the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs to discuss the decision of the SPCC in this regard. These individuals are not empowered to overturn committee decisions.

3.5    The decision of the SPCC made under Section 3.0 shall prevail and remain in effect until altered by the decision of the SPCC in its review under Section 5.0 or the decision of the Executive Committee of CMED.

4.0 Monitoring Student Conduct

4.1    All concerns about possible student misconduct raised by any person should be directed to the SPCC as discussed in Section Two: Standards, Conduct, and Professionalism, under Student Misconduct.

4.2    SPCC Process of Review:

Once a concern about a student's conduct is brought to the chair of the SPCC, a two–step process will be initiated as quickly as possible. The first step (in all cases) will be a quick review by a small ad hoc committee (described below). When warranted, a second step shall consist of a formal hearing before the full committee.

4.2.1   Ad Hoc Review:

For each allegation of student misconduct, the chair shall appoint a group of three voting members of the committee to interview all witnesses and the students involved and review all evidence. At the end of this review, the group shall prepare a written summary of the evidence and a conclusion. The group has the option to conclude either 1) no action is warranted (e.g., evidence is inconclusive, or evidence is solid but the misconduct was minor), or that 2) the case should be referred to the full SPCC for a formal hearing. In either case, the summary letter about the case shall go into the student's file in the Registrar's (or equivalent position's) Office. The ad hoc group may also ask the chair to send a written warning to the student, but not initiate any other formal disciplinary action on its own. If a formal disciplinary action is indicated (e.g., suspension or separation), then the case is referred by the ad hoc group to the full committee. If the student disagrees with the letter prepared by the chair at the direction of the ad hoc group, then the student may request that the matter move on to the full committee for a formal review.

4.2.2   Full Review:

When a formal review by the full SPCC is warranted (either at the request of the student, or by referral from the ad hoc group), then a specific set of rules will apply. The formal hearing will include any witnesses and evidence as deemed appropriate by the chair. The student may also propose to include evidence or witnesses approved by the chair, and review all evidence submitted. The committee and student involved will hear all witnesses approved by the chair, and review all evidence submitted. All written evidence to be entered must be made available to both the student and the committee at least three days before the hearing. Both the accuser and the accused may be asked to submit written summaries in advance of the meeting, which both can review. Questions by the accuser and the accused shall be directed to the chair. Members of the committee can directly question the accuser or the accused student. All proceedings except the deliberations of the committee will be documented. A copy of this record will be made available to the complainant and the student respondent, if requested. Minutes will not include the discussion, but only the formal motion made and the vote. The SPCC will decide each case on its own merits; no automatic disciplinary action is warranted for any particular case. Actions may include suspension, required leave of absence, separation, or other, less severe, penalties.

The SPCC is to proceed in such cases first by voting on whether or not misconduct occurred. If the finding is that misconduct did occur, then the committee will move on to consider and vote on possible appropriate actions.

For the SPCC to conclude that a student is guilty of misconduct, a simple majority of voting members present must vote that the find "clear and convincing proof" that misconduct did occur. If a student is found guilty of misconduct and a subsequent vote is taken on a motion to either suspend or separate the student, then that motion must be approved by 2/3 or more of voting members present to pass.

A student may appeal the SPCC decision, and the appeals process will follow the same process outlined for academic performance issues (outlined below). The outcome of any disciplinary determination action by the SPCC will become part of the student's permanent record. These procedures may be supplemented or modified, as necessary, to achieve a full and fair resolution of the relevant matter. Revised guidelines for the SPCC will be included in each year's edition of the student policy handbook.

5.0 Review of Student Promotion and Conduct Committee Decisions

5.1    If the student does not agree with the decision of the SPCC regarding academic performance or misconduct, the student shall have the right, within ten (10) days of receiving notice of the decision of the SPCC, to request in writing to the SPCC that the SPCC review its decision in a formal meeting.  When submitting the request, the student shall specify the grounds for the review and shall provide the SPCC with all necessary supporting documents.

5.2    Within seven (7) days of receiving the notice from the student requesting a formal review of its earlier decision, the SPCC shall notify the student in writing of the date for the review meeting.  If the student has any problems with respect to the proposed date for the meeting, the student shall notify the chair of the SPCC as soon as possible thereafter and every reasonable effort will be made to re-schedule to a date with a reasonable lead time. All meetings can be accommodated by video and/or telecommunication but cannot be recorded.  In addition, every reasonable effort shall be made by both parties to have the review meeting within forty (40) days of the date of receipt of the written notice from the student requesting the review.

5.3    The student shall represent herself/himself to the SPCC. The student shall have the right to be accompanied by an advocate at the meeting. The advocate may advise the student, but cannot address the SPCC or participate directly in the proceedings.

5.4    The review shall be conducted by the SPCC or a subcommittee of the SPCC duly established for this purpose.

5.5    The following procedure shall apply with respect to the hearing before the SPCC:

a)   The hearing shall commence on the date and time appointed for the hearing.

b)   The student will make an opening statement containing a brief description of the student's grounds for appeal including what the student believes was unfair, unjust or unreasonable about the decision of the SPCC and what remedy the student seeks.

c)   The student shall have the right to supplement the opening statement with any or all of the following:

i.    oral testimony of the student;

ii.   oral testimony of any witness supporting the position of the student; and

iii.  documents or other written evidence in support of this testimony.

d)   CMED (the "Respondent"), through its designated representative or legal counsel and the SPCC, will have the right to question the student and/or the student's witnesses at the close of each person's testimony.

e)   Following the completion of the student's case, the Respondent shall present its case. The Respondent shall complete an opening statement containing a brief reply to the student's claims and the main arguments justifying the action or decision that was made by the SPCC.  In support of its position, the Respondent may submit any or all of the following:

i.    oral testimony of a representative of the Respondent;

ii.   oral testimony of any witnesses selected by the Respondent; and

iii.  documents or other written evidence in support of this testimony.

f)    The student and the SPCC will have the right to question the Respondent's witnesses at the close of each person's testimony.

g)   The student shall have the right to offer testimony or other evidence in reply to the issues raised in the Respondent's case.

h)   After the testimony of each witness, the SPCC may, in addition to asking questions of the witness as noted above, request copies of such documents mentioned in the testimony as the SPCC, in its discretion, deems appropriate.

i)    At the conclusion of the evidence, the parties shall be entitled to make closing arguments and to summarize briefly the main points of their respective cases in the following order:

i.    student;

ii.   respondent; and

iii.  student.

The SPCC shall have the right to alter this order in the interests and fairness to any or all of the parties.

j)    The SPCC may consider and grant a recess or an adjournment at any time during the hearing to ensure a fair hearing.

k)   A person appearing before the SPCC may be required to give evidence under affirmation or oath.

l)    The SPCC shall have the discretion to limit the testimony in questioning of witnesses to those matters it considers relevant to the disposition of the case.

m)  Parties are responsible for producing their own witnesses and for paying the costs associated with their appearance before the SPCC .

n)   The SPCC shall have the power to require production of written or documentary evidence by the parties or by any other source.

o)   The SPCC has the power to rule on the admissibility of evidence.

p)   Following the formal hearing, the SPCC shall deliberate in a closed session and shall reach a decision.

q)   The SPCC shall supply a written report of its decision to the student, the Respondent c/o the CurrCom and Executive Committee and to such other individuals as the SPCC deems appropriate and/or necessary.  The report shall include:

i.    the membership of the tribunal;

ii.   the background of the appeal;

iii.  a summary of the case of the student and the Respondent;

iv.  the SPCC's findings of fact;

v.   the SPCC's decision and the reasons for its decision.

 

The SPCC will record in writing the process by which the hearing was conducted.

5.6    Subject to any further right of review.  The decision of the SPCC in this regard shall be final and binding.

6.0 Graduation

6.1    Upon successful degree audit, the SPCC will provide the names of each student recommended for graduation to the CMED faculty for notification to the graduates.

Good Academic Standing

A student is considered to be in good academic standing if he/she has achieved "Pass," or higher designation for a given course and has completed all other program requirements satisfactorily. A student with "No Pass" in a course(s), un-remediated coursework, or any outstanding misconduct issues is not considered to be in good academic standing. The designation of good academic standing is required for student leadership roles, and opportunities such as, but not limited to, internships and research. Annually, the SPCC will make this designation for each student based upon their academic conduct record.

Deceleration/Extended Academic Program

Deceleration (i.e. taking fewer courses than the curriculum schedule dictates) will be difficult due to the integrated nature of the CMED curriculum. This may rarely occur in atypical circumstances at the discretion of the Associate Dean of Medical Education, with involvement of the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs and review by the SPCC.

Leave of Absence

A leave of absence (LOA) is a temporary suspension of medical school studies for a period of one month or longer, not to exceed one year. Brief absences are addressed in Student Assessment Regulations, in detail, earlier in this section of the handbook. A leave of absence may be voluntary or involuntary as defined and described below.

Voluntary Leave of Absence

Students may need time away from school due to, but not limited to, the following situations:

       Personal illness/health related

       Family illness

       Crisis of personal or family nature

       Research or clinical fellowship programs

       Military duty

 

A student may request a LOA in writing (university email is acceptable) to the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs. The request must contain the time period (not to exceed one year), the reason for the LOA, arrangements for notifying any faculty, staff, or student colleagues affected by LOA, and arrangements for coverage affecting clinical or course work if applicable (i.e., student takes LOA during clerkship assignment, or during time when they are working in small groups).

A personal medical leave requires a supporting letter from the student's personal physician.  A second opinion from a physician selected by CMED may also be required. A 'release to return to work/school' letter from the student's physician is required 6 weeks prior to return. Depending on the individual case and after review by the SPCC, a medical LOA may be renewed.

 

The Assistant Dean of Student Affairs will present the student's request to the SPCC for review and will contact the student with their decision.

Involuntary Leave of Absence

Under certain circumstances involving academic or professional deficiencies or other concerns, the SPCC may place a student on an involuntary LOA for a period of one month or longer, not to exceed one year. A recommended plan for that student's LOA and possible return will be developed by the SPCC and given to the student.

If it is determined that a student is a threat to themselves or others, and/or the student could pose other safety issues, the Dean, any of the Associate Deans, Assistant Dean of Student Affairs, and/or SPCC has the right to place that student on immediate involuntary LOA, with the SPCC review to take place after this decision and immediate action. Based on the situation, the SPCC will determine the further actions.

Please refer to the financial aid section (section four) of the handbook concerning tuition and leaves of absence.

Voluntary Withdrawal

Withdrawal is a permanent and voluntary termination of studies instituted by the medical student. Students wishing to withdraw must submit a written request to the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs.  The request must include the reason(s) for withdrawal and a statement that the student understands that withdrawal is voluntary and permanent.  In addition to the written request, it is advised that the student meet with the Assistant Dean of Student affairs as well. A student who has withdrawn will have to reapply to CMED if he/she decides to return.

Involuntary Withdrawal

The SPCC may recommend a student withdraws from the medical education program. Withdrawal in this sense would be permanent termination of studies as a result of failure to demonstrate adequate progress related to academics or conduct at any point in the curriculum. Details about recommendations of withdrawal are found in this section under Student Promotion, Review, and Remediation Policy.

Accommodations in Assessment(s) for Student with Disabilities Policy

1.0    All CMED students must meet the Technical Standards for Admission published in Section Two of the Student Handbook.  CMED recognizes, however, that some learners will have disabilities or be temporarily limited in terms of their ability.  In order to reasonably accommodate such learners, some modifications to the assessment process may be considered if it can be accomplished without compromising academic standards or patient safety and well-being.

1.1    Disability is defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendment Act found at http://www.ada.gov/pubs/adastatute08.htm#12102.  

         The CMU Office of Student Disability Services also publishes this definition in the Documentation Guidelines, https://go.cmich.edu/support_services/academic/StudentDisabilityServices/SDSProspectiveStudents/Pages/Documentation_Guidelines.aspx. 

         CMU and CMED are committed to facilitating the integration of students with disabilities into the university community.  Each student with a disability is entitled to reasonable accommodation that will assist him/her to meet the academic standards as defined in these regulations and to facilitate the student's progress.  Reasonable accommodation may require those responsible for student assessment to exercise creativity and flexibility in responding to the needs of students while maintaining academic and technical standards.

1.2    Accommodation, however, cannot compromise academic standards, or patient safety or well-being.  The student with a disability must be able to demonstrate the knowledge and perform the necessary skills independently.  There are a few circumstances in which an intermediary may be appropriate.  However, no disability can be accommodated if the intermediary has to provide cognitive support, substitute for cognitive skills, perform a physical examination, or in any way supplement clinical judgment: these are de facto requirements for the occupational role of physician.

1.3    Central to the success of a student with a disability in completing the MD program is his/her responsibility to demonstrate self-reliance and to identify needs requiring accommodation in a timely fashion.  It is in the student's best interest to identify their need for accommodation early.  CMED encourages incoming learners to take such action immediately following their offer of admission.  Early declaration enables CMED to take decisive actions so that the learner's academic programs will be seamless.

1.4    Learners should disclose their disability and/or need for accommodations to the Office of Student Affairs, including any relevant documentation of previous accommodations in post-secondary education.  Depending on a variety of factors, (including any previous accommodation at the post-secondary level, prior psycho-educational testing, formal diagnoses, and whether the disability is permanent or temporary, for example) a psycho-educational assessment may be required through the university.

1.5    Learners with a disability must register annually with the CMU Office of Student Disability Services.  An individualized plan regarding accommodations (if appropriate) will be recommended and forwarded annually to CMED's Student Affairs Office, https://netconnect.cmich.edu/disabilityservices/.  

1.6    The Office of Student Affairs will review the plan in consultation with the learner and the Associate Dean for Medical Education.  The Assistant Dean of Student Affairs will summarize the findings of that meeting, including any areas of agreement and disagreement, and bring this as an item for consideration at a session of the SPCC; the learner shall have the right to speak to the SPCC during this session, but will not be present during the committee's deliberations.  During the session, the SPCC will make a final decision regarding the individualized assessment plan for the learner.

1.7    Following the decision of the SPCC, the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs will meet with the student to discuss the approved plan, and will also communicate the decision to the CMU Office of Student Disability Services.

1.8   Accommodation plans for students with disabilities shall be reviewed annually by the SPCC.

1.9    The Office of Student Affairs will provide accommodated learners with counseling regarding whether the accommodation will be recognized and granted by the United States Medical Licensure Examination (USMLE).  For example, Kurzweil assistive technology may be approved for use as an accommodation while a student at CMED, but the USMLE may not permit its use during the licensing examination.        

Academic Records

Maintaining and Dissemination of Student Records

CMED will follow the AAMC's Guidelines for Maintaining Active and Permanent Individual Student Records. Electronic medical student educational records will be secure and held confidentially in Central Michigan University information systems. These systems are protected first by a campus firewall. Inside the firewall, the records are accessible on a need-to-know basis, determined by the offices of student affairs, admissions, financial aid, or the registrar. Our systems include a centralized intrusion detection system, which is sensitive and monitored meticulously. The operating system for the vast majority of the record content is in a SAP ("Systems, Applications and Products in Data Processing") administrative framework. Most academic records will be kept in an electronic format. Hard copy records will be housed in a locked file within the Office of Student Affairs, the Office of Admissions, the Office of the Registrar/or equivalent position, or the Office of Financial Aid. These offices will be kept locked during non-working hours.

Access to Records

Information about student record access is found at this site:

https://www.cmich.edu/registrar_office/RegistrarRecords/Pages/Confidentiality.aspx

 

University policy grants students access to their education records under conditions which conform to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 as amended and regulated by the appropriate federal guidelines.

 

Directory information may be published or released by the university unless a student informs the Registrar's Office in writing that any or all items should not be released without the student's prior consent. Application documents to which the student has waived his/her right of access will not be included in any student record file to which a student has FERPA right of access. Directory information is defined to include such items as: a student's name, address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height (of members of athletic teams), dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and the previous educational institution attended by the student.

Review

Students have access to their records by making the request through the CMED Office of Student Affairs.  For review purposes, please refer to Student Assessment Regulations for Years 1 and 2 earlier in this section. This addresses review of components of a grade and review of a course grade and the time frame associated with each process.