Dr. Daelyn Woolnough 
Dr. Woolnough

About Dr. Daelyn Woolnough

Job Title: Assistant Professor of Biology

Dr. Woolnough’s interests revolve around understanding the biological processes and mechanisms underlying spatial patterns.Spatial patterns affect the distribution and diversity of species. Variation in spatial patterns affects the persistence of populations.

She focuses on the ecological movement through metapopulation theory (i.e., connectivity through corridor movement). Metapopulation theory can be applied to host-parasite communities as well as species-resource spatial dynamics.

Dr. Woolnough has used the idea of spatial ecology to consider spatial distribution of mussels, fish, benthic invertebrates as well as terrestrial populations of dogwoods and wild radishes. Her current research emphasizes how populations and communities are connected by physical structure or functional connections (e.g., resources or host movement) in space and time and whether the variability of empirical data can be used to predict survival and distribution.

Currently, the Woolnough lab is considering the host fish/freshwater mussel communities in Michigan rivers, benthic macroinvertebrate distribution, stranded mussel protocol during dam repairs and movement of aquatic organisms through culverts. Lots of field work is done when the weather is nice and water is low (and sometimes when it is not)! The Woolnough lab also deals with GIS for mapping and predictions of species distribution.

Contact Dr. Woolnough at wooln1d@cmich.edu, or visit her in Brooks 160.