Senior Design Projects
​​2014 Showcase 
 
Our 8th annual showcase of Senior Design Projects in engineering took place on Friday, May 2 from 1:00-4:00 PM in room 116 of the Engineering and Technology Building and included the following presentations:

  • 1:00-1:20 PM, Power Flow
    Jeff Sherwood, Nichole Spino, Taylor Warczinsky, Ze Zhang
    Faculty Advisor: Dr. Qin Hu

    Power transfer capability and levels of power flow through transmission line in an electrical power system are essential for planning and operation purposes.  Measurements through SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) system are not always accurate.  Numerical solutions to rule out "bad" measurements or to predict power flow under abnormal operation conditions such as short-circuit of a line would be studied.  Currently several numerical methods for calculating power flow in a specific power system are explored.  The primary goal of this project is to find a method to refine the application of established solution techniques through the application of partial fractions to improve the resolution of obtained results for solving, large, networked linear and nonlinear mathematical models.

  • 1:20-1:40 PM, Robotic Delivery System
    Daniel Fondriest, Ben Miskulin, Kyle Smith, Kathryn Van Ham
    Faculty Advisor: Dr. Frank Cheng
    Our project was to develop and implement a “Robotic Sample Delivery System” for automating the existing Malvern testing process in Dow’s research laboratory to enhance efficiency. The challenge was to successfully integrate existing resources
    such as the Tecan Evo robot, cuvette samples, and other required peripherals into a reliable and functional robot system. Major tasks included identifying process variables and parameters, designing system layout, testing robot’s accuracy and repeatability, sizing robot gripper, manipulating different cuvette samples with programmed robot motions, and detecting and preventing possible system malfunctions.

  • 1:40-2:00 PM, TCP Drum Project
    Zane Breslin, Gregory Oldham, Erik Sinicki, Corey Rodabaugh
    Faculty Advisor: Dr. Jinxiang Xi
    The drum is the one of the most vital components of a wood chipper, used to pulverize tree limbs and brush into wood chips; then discharge the chips at a reasonable speed and distance. Our goal was to improve safety, effectiveness and cost by developing a
    new production process and design to give Morbark a strong competitive advantage over the competition. Safety standards will be met by several analyses, including finite element analysis (FEA), weld strength testing, and other mathematical models. The drum is expected to be scalable to enable it to be used on all Tree Care Product machines and save money on any machine it is used by.

  • 2:00-2:20 PM, Hydraulic Pump Stand
    Jordan Bricker, Kevin Kline II, Jordan Rohlinger, Patrick Ruhlman, Zach Tranter
    Faculty Advisor: Dr. Terence Lerch
    This project required the team to fabricate and test a prototype pump stand. The objective is to deliver Morbark a new and more efficient pump design that can be used across all the necessary pump sizes needed. In order to deliver the pump prototype and
    the family it is a part of, work has been done since the beginning of the year to organize the necessary ranges for the individual pumps, as well as developing the best design. After finishing the design, testing was done on the pump to gain knowledge for how to make future pumps even more efficient while proving the design for Morbark, Inc..

  • 2:20-2:40 PM, Robotic Arm
    Brooke Berwald, Zachary Eisen, Justin Gillon, Stephen Rey
    Faculty Advisor: Dr. Ahmed Abdelgawad

    The goal of this project is to design and implement a robotic arm that precisely mimics the operator’s arm movements. The design includes a fully operative robotic arm directed by sensors that are placed on the operator’s arm. The robotic arm and gripper
    movements will mimic the motion with human likeability using precise, smooth and fluid movements with minimal lag. Furthermore, the mechanical design will remove excess play in the joints. The electrical design will lessen the amount of servo overshoot.

  • 2:40-3:00 PM, Limitless Resources: Application of Modern Energy Harvesting Systems
    Brianna Ohlert, Jared Jorgensen, Fei Pang, Steven Shapardanis
    Faculty Advisor: Dr. Tolga Kaya
    To create reliable, sustainable energy system generated from building inhabitants, we considered mechanical power generators, piezoelectric tabs, solar cells, and wind turbines. Three tasks were: application selection and implementation; power generation
    selection and design; and power conditioning development. We chose a mobile device charging station with a tablet display. Three power generation concepts were: a geared motor door system, human powered mechanical generator, and a solar panel.  The proposed mechanical generator is Rube Goldberg inspired, which creates potential energy from a door swing by lifting a mass, when released, rotates a motor driven shaft to converting the energy from mechanical into electrical. DC-DC converter topologies
    were developed for the power generation module and application side power conditioning.
  • 3:00-3:20 PM, CMU Baja Transmission
    Travis Bussell, Michael Grundner, Derek Hoffman, Daniel Matash, Wesley Shaw
    Faculty Advisor: Dr. Joseph Langenderfer
    The Society of Automotive Engineers hosts an inter-collegiate design competition that requires teams to engineer a small off-road baja vehicle. A limitation of the competition is that all teams must use the same 10 horsepower engine. The Central Michigan University Baja Team has challenged five students to develop a transmission that optimizes the output of the required engine. The transmission consists of a 5:1 simple gear train which will deliver a theoretical top speed of 55mph when coupled with the baja vehicle drive-train, a 34% increase from the teams past vehicle.