GLSIAM Conference Schedule

Saturday, April 20, 2013

9:00 AM-5:00 PM

Time Activity
9:00-9:50 AM Registration and Coffee
9:50-10:00 AM
Dow Science Complex 135
Opening Remarks
George E. Ross, Ph.D., President,
Central Michigan University
​10:00-10:05 AM
​GLSIAM Chapter Announcement
​10:05-11:05 AM
Dow Science Complex 135
​Plenary Talk:
From PDEs to Information Science and Back

Russel Caflisch, Director,
Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics
11:05-11:15 AM
Coffee Break
11:15 AM-12:15 PM
Contributed Talks: Special Session A
A1 (Dow 135 - Graeme Fairweather, Tong Sun)
A2 (Dow 171 - Valeriy Ginzburg, Henry Boateng)
12:15-1:30 PM Lunch - Woldt Dining Hall
1:30-2:30 PM
Dow Science Complex 135
Plenary Talk: Computational Analysis of Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion Processes
Hans Othmer, University of Minnesota, Department of Mathematics
2:30-2:50 PM Poster Session and Coffee Break
2:50-3:50 PM Contributed Talks: Special Session B
B1 (Dow 135 - Kun Gou, Vani Cheruvu)
B2 (Dow 171 - Arunasalam Rahunanthan, Libin Rong)
B3 (Dow 175 - Weiqun Zhang, Xiaoming Zheng)

3:50-4:00 PM Coffee Break
4:00-5:00 PM
Dow Science Complex 135
Plenary Talk:
Variational Multiscale Models for Biomolecules
Guowei Wei, Michigan State University,
Department of Mathematics
​5:00-5:05 PM
Dow Science Complex 135
​Student Poster Awards
​5:05 PM ​End

Note: Each contributed talk of a special session is 30 minutes long.

Opening Remarks

George E. Ross, Ph.D. President, Central Michigan University

Dow Science Complex 135, 9:50-10:00 AM
Chair: En-Bing Lin​

Plenary Talks

From PDEs to Information Science and Back
Russel Caflisch, Director, Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics

Dow Science Complex 135, 10:05-11:05 AM
Chair: Leela Rakesh

The arrival of massive amounts of data from imaging, sensors, computation and the internet brings with it challenges for information science. New methods for analysis and manipulation of big data have come from many fields of mathematical science. Among these, the application of ideas from PDEs, such as variational principles and numerical diffusion, to information science is the first focus of this presentation. The second focus is the emerging influence back to PDEs of very successful ideas from information science, such as sparsity and compressed sensing.

Computational Analysis of Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion Processes
Hans Othmer, University of Minnesota, Department of Mathematics


Dow Science Complex 135, 1:30-2:30 PM
Chair: Xiaoming Zheng

Reaction and diffusion processes are used to model chemical and biological processes over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Several routes to the diffusion process at various levels of description in time and space are discussed and the master equation for spatially-discretized systems involving reaction and diffusion is developed. We discuss an estimator for the appropriate compartment size for simulating reaction-diffusion systems and introduce a measure of fluctuations in a discretized system. We then describe a new computational algorithm for implementing a modified Gillespie method for compartmental systems in which reactions are aggregated into equivalence classes and computational cells are searched via an optimized tree structure.  Finally, we discuss several examples that illustrate the issues that have to be addressed in general systems​.

Variational Multiscale Models for Biomolecules
Guowei Wei, Michigan State University, Department of Mathematics


Dow Science Complex 135, 4:00-5:00 PM
Chair: En-Bing Lin

A major feature of biological sciences in the 21st century will be their transition from phenomenological and descriptive disciplines to quantitative and predictive ones. Revolutionary opportunities have emerged for mathematically driven advances in biological research. However, the emergence of complexity in self-organizing biological systems poses fabulous challenges to their quantitative description because of the excessively high dimensionality. A crucial question is how to reduce the number of degrees of freedom, while preserving the fundamental physics in complex biological systems. This work focuses on a new variational multiscale paradigm for biomolecular systems. Under the physiological condition, most biological processes, such as protein folding, ion channel transport and signal transduction, occur in water, which consists of 65-90 percent of human cell mass. Therefore, it is desirable to describe macromolecules by discrete atomic and/or quantum mechanical variables; while treating the aqueous environment as a dielectric or hydrodynamic continuum. I will discuss the use of differential geometry for coupling microscopic and macroscopic scales on an equal footing. Based on the variational principle, we derive the coupled Poisson-Boltzmann, Nernst-Planck (or Kohn-Sham), Laplace-Beltrami and Navier-Stokes equations for the structure, dynamics and transport of ion-channel systems.

Contributed Talks

Morning Contributed Talks
  • A1. Session chair: Meera Mainkar
    Dow Science Complex 135, 11:15-11:45 AM

    Compact optimal spline collocation methods for convection-diffusion problems
    Graeme Fairweather, Mathematical Reviews

    Dow Science Complex 135, 11:45 AM-12:15 PM
    Numerical smoothness and error analysis of time-dependent PDEs
    Tong Sun, Bowling Green State University

  • A2. Session chair: James Angelos
    Dow Science Complex 171, 11:15-11:45 AM
    Combining Physical Resist Modeling and Self-Consistent Field Theory for Pattern Simulation in Directed Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers in Nanolithography
    Valeriy Ginzburg, The Dow Chemical Company

    Dow Science Complex 171, 11:45 AM-12:15 PM
    Approximating Off-Lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo
    Henry Boateng, University of Michigan
Afternoon Contributed Talks
  • B1. Session chair: Ching-I Cheng
    Dow Science Complex 135, 2:50-3:20 PM
    Algorithms for numerical solution of the Goursat problem on a triangular domain with mixed boundary conditions
    Kun Gou, Michigan State University

    Dow Science Complex 135, 3:20-3:50 PM
    Sensitivity analysis for spectral element based two-layered shallow water model
    Vani Cheruvu, The University of Toledo

  • B2. Session chair: Yeonhyang Kim
    Dow Science Complex 171, 2:50-3:20 PM
    Predictive Simulation for Porous Media Flows on GPUs
    Arunasalam Rahunanthan, University of Toledo

    Dow Science Complex 171, 3:20-3:50 PM
    Modeling within-host dynamics of influenza virus infection
    Libin Rong, Oakland University

  • B3. Session chair: C-Y. Jean Chan
    Dow Science Complex 175, 2:50-3:20 PM
    Numerical Methods for High Dimensional Singular Perturbation Problems
    Weiqun Zhang, Wright State University

    Dow Science Complex 175, 3:20-3:50 PM
    Interface-fitted adaptive mesh method for free interface problems with surface tension based on level-set formulation
    Xiaoming Zheng, Central Michigan Univer​sity