H1.2 Historical Inquiry and Analysis: Use historical inquiry and analysis to study the past​ ​

6–H1.2.1
Explain how historians use a variety of sources to explore the past (e.g., artifacts, primary and secondary sources including narratives, technology, historical maps, visual/mathematical quantitative data, radiocarbon dating, DNA analysis).

Related Geography GLCEs:

Lesson Plans:
GeoHistoGram Activity Set:
H1.4 Historical Understanding: Use historical concepts, patterns, and themes to study the past.​ ​

6–H1.4.1
Describe and use cultural institutions to study an era and a region (political, economic, religion/belief, science/technology, written language, education, family). ​

Related Geography GLCEs:

Lesson Plans:
GeoHistoGram Activity Set:

6–H1.4.2
Describe and use themes of history to study patterns of change and continuity.

Lesson Plans:

GeoHistoGram Activity Set:
Resources:

W1.1 Peopling of the Earth: Describe the spread of people in the Western Hemisphere in Era 1. ​

6–W1.1.1
Describe the early migrations of people among Earth's continents (including the Berringa Land Bridge).  

Related Geography GLCEs:

Lesson Plans:
Maps:
W1.2 Agricultural Revolution: Describe the Agricultural Revolution and explain why it is a turning point in history. ​

6–W1.2.1
Describe the transition from hunter gatherers to sedentary agriculture (domestication of plants and animals).

Lesson Plans:


6–W1.2.2
Describe the importance of the natural environment in the development of agricultural settlements in different locations (e.g., available water for irrigation, adequate precipitation, and suitable growing season). 

Related Geography GLCEs:

Lesson Plan:
Maps:
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W2.1 Early Civilizations and Early Pastoral Societies: Describe the characteristics of early Western Hemisphere civilizations and pastoral societies.

6–W2.1.1
Explain how the environment favored hunter gatherer, pastoral and small scale agricultural ways of life in different parts of the Western Hemisphere

Related Geography GLCEs:


6–W2.1.2
Describe how the invention of agriculture led to the emergence of agrarian civilizations (seasonal harvests, specialized crops, cultivation, and development of villages and towns).

Related Geography GLCEs:

Lesson Plans:
GeoHistoGram Activity Set:

6–W2.1.3
Use multiple sources of evidence to describe how the culture of early peoples of North America reflected the geography and natural resources available (e.g., Inuit of the Arctic, Kwakiutl of the Northwest Coast; Anasazi and Apache of the Southwest).

Related Geography GLCEs:


6–W2.1.4
Use evidence to identify defining characteristics of early civilizations and early pastoral nomads (government, language, religion, social structure, technology, and division of labor).

W3.1 Classical Traditions and Major Empires in the Western Hemisphere: Describe empires and agrarian civilizations in Mesoamerica and South America. ​

6–W3.1.1
Analyze the role of environment in the development of early empires, referencing both useful environmental features and those that presented obstacles.

Related Geography GLCEs:
Web Lesson:

6–W3.1.2
Explain the role of economics in shaping the development of early civilizations (trade routes and their significance – Inca Road, supply and demand for products).

Related Geography GLCEs:
Web Lesson:

6–W3.1.3
Describe similarities and difference among Mayan, Aztec, and Incan societies, including economy, religion, and role and class structure.

Web Lesson:

6–W3.1.4
Describe the regional struggles and changes in governmental systems among the Mayan, Aztec, and Incan Empires.

Related Geography GLCEs:
Web Lesson:

6–W3.1.5
Construct a timeline of main events on the origin and development of early and classic ancient civilizations of the Western Hemisphere (Olmec, Mayan, Aztec, and Incan).

Related Geography GLCEs: