​​​​​​Safety Alert.jpg
Computer use can be monitored and is difficult to hide.  
If you are in an unsafe relationship or in ​danger, please use a public computer.


What Domestic Violence and Intimate Partner Violence Entails
Domestic Violence and Intimate Partner Violence are defined as an intentional act used to gain power and control over another person, which may include: 

  • Physical Assaults
  • Sexual Assaults
  • Emotional Abuse
  • Verbal Abuse
  • Isolation
  • Minimizing and Blaming
  • Controlling Behaviors
  • Using Children
  • Using Coercion and Threats
  • Using Intimidation
  • Stalking

Who This May Affect
  • Married
  • Separated or divorced
  • Ex and/or current partners
  • Those in dating relationships
  • Individuals who have child in common
  • Those living together

You May Experience

  • There is no single way in which people respond to Domestic Violence and Intimate Partner Violence.

  • Common feelings may include:
    • Fear
    • Trapped/Helpless
    • Guilt/Shame
    • Confusion
    • Anxiety/Worry
    • Numbness/Disconnected
    • Hopelessness
    • Unworthy
  • ​​​​You may be concerned about how friends, family, co-workers, or your partner will respond.

Things to Know
  • Experiencing Domestic Violence and Intimate Partner Violence is not your fault.
  • Talking with a trained advocate can really make a difference.
  • Whether you experienced DV / IPV recently or many years ago, you have the right to safety and freedom.
  • You have the right to support and assistance.

Safety Considerations
It is your choice what steps you choose to take. Be aware that the most dangerous time for one experiencing Domestic Violence/Intimate Partner Violence is when they attempt to or leave the relationship. SAPA can assist you with crisis intervention and provide helpful information on safety planning and resources. Below is a list of suggestions you may find helpful:

  • If you are in immediate danger, call 911.
  • If possible, get to a safe place.
  • Call someone you trust for emotional support.
  • Contact SAPA to speak to an advocate who can answer questions, provide emotional. support, and provide other resources as desired.

Resources