Personal Narratives
  • Andrew (Union Soldier). Letter to Maria, 1862 May 25. 1 item (2 pages). Letter written while encamped near Fort Logan, mentions trip to Mount Vernon and that he expects the war to end soon. Bio: Member of the 101st NY Infantry.

 

  • Anonymous. Diary, 1864-1865. 1 item (6 pages). Typescript of a diary with brief entries from July 10, 1864 to Feb. 1, 1865. Entries primarily record: work details, food, letters, foraging, weather, and deaths. Of some interest is the brief account of a Rebel raid on August 21, 1864. The unit mustered out on Sept. 23, 1864 and entries following that date concern school. Bio: Resident of Burlington, WI and a member of a Wisconsin unit in the Civil War.

 

  • Avis, William. Diary, 1862-1865. 1 vol. (80 pages). Diary with fairly detailed entries of extensive fiscal accounts mixed with diary entries. A substantial portion of the diary was written while Avis was in New Orleans and Alabama. Bio: Avis was a member of the 9th Illinois Infantry, Company D.

 

  • Baker, Horace A. Diaries, 1864-1865. 2 vol. Diaries, 1864 has longer entries while 1865 are very brief. Diaries describe work details; weather; food; letters; and during the early months, he wrote down the countersigns. A brief service history is also included. Bio: Baker was a resident of Schoolcraft (MI) and a member of the 14th Michigan Battery.

 

  • Bangs, Chester H. Letter, 1861 Sept. 29. 2 items. Letter describing the hardships of a soldier's life, mentions blacks and the size of the army around Washington. Expects to be home by the new year. Includes brief service history. Bio: Bangs, a resident of Napoleon (MI), served in the 7th Michigan Infantry, Company B.

 

  • Baughman, Homer. Letter, 1864 Nov. 25. 2 items. Letter written while stationed at Memphis, TN. Discusses women and the vote of the company in the election of 1864. Also, a brief service history. Bio: Resident of Van Buren County, MI; served with the 3rd Michigan Cavalry, Company A.

 

  • Bebee, Nelson W. Family Correspondence, 1861-1865 of John and Nelson Bebee. Finding aid. Bio: Bebee enlisted in 1862 at age 23 in Company B, Michigan 4th Cavalry. He was promoted to Corporal 1862. Transferred to Invalid Corps in 1863 and discharged in 1865. John enlisted on Aug. 6, 1861 in Company H, Michigan 5th Infantry at age 19. He was mustered on Aug. 28, 1861, re-enlisted on Dec. 15, 1863 and was again mustered on Dec. 27, 1863. He was killed in action near Petersburg (Va.) on June 16, 1864. Also the letters of John W. Bradner, A. E. Ferdon, the Bebee sisters, and other friends.

 

  • Bentz, Daniel R. K Letters, 1861, 1865. 5 items. Letters written to David M. Browsey of Manheim, Lancaster County, PA, relating a story about capturing a cannon hidden in the barn of a Rebel sympathizer near Washington, D.C., a fierce battle with "Louisiana Tigers," a descritpion of Lee's surrender, and inquiries regarding finding a wife. Bio: Bentz served with both the 7th Penn. Infantry, Co. C; and the 190th Penn. Infantry, Co. I.

 

  • Berry, Charles (Union Soldier). Letter, 1864 Sept. 13. 1 item (2 pages). Photocopy of a letter written while encamped near Petersburgh describing hardships of a soldier's life and picket duty. Bio: Berry was a member of the 61st New York Infantry Regiment, Company H.

 

  • Birkenhauer, William H., 1840- Portfolio, 1903. Portfolio book printed by the Soldiers and Sailors Historical and Benevolent Society to preserve certified copies of records of US servicemen. Contains Birkenhauer's picture and certificate of record. Also contains engravings of buildings in Washington, presidents, Civil War leaders, and corps badges. Bio: Born Nardheim, Germany; emigrated to Mobile, AL, 1856; served with the 37th Ohio Inf., Co K; married Fredericka Diehl at Monroe, MI in 1868.

 

  • Blodgett, J. H. Letter, 1865 Jan. 21. 1 item (4 pages). Letter to "Will" describing the USS Morse, a ball he attended in St. Marys County, MD, and updates on the activities of mutual friends. Bio: Blodgett served on the steamers USS Morse and USS Commodore Read.

 

  • Bradish, Orrin H. Diary, 1864. 1 vol. (142 pages). Brief entries describing weather; duties; deaths; and activities of units in the area, occasionally involving local negroes. A brief service history is also included. Bio: Bradish was a resident of Madison (MI) who served in the 18th Michigan Infantry, Company I.

 

  • Brent, W. L. Letter, 1863 Feb. 1. 1 item (4 pages). Letter directed to a member of the 4th Michigan Cavalry relating news of various soldiers in that unit, including: Timothy Sheppard, Orlando Hawley, and Byron W. Lanphear. Bio: Brent was a resident of Detroit, MI

 

  • Buck, R. Mortimer, 1833-1902. Papers, 1850, 1909. .5 cubic ft. (in 1 box). Papers, 1850-1909 and undated, include his diaries, 1862-1865, which describe his experience in the Civil War, Michigan Cavalry 4th Regiment, his march from Detroit (MI) to the Battle of Murfreesboro (TN), camp life, equipment, cavalry pickets, and fighting at Chattanooga and Trenton (TN). Bio: Buck was from Paw Paw (MI) and served in the Michigan Cavalry 4th Regiment, Cos. A & C. He was honorably discharged with the rank of Captain in 1865. He died on Dec. 8, 1902 and was buried in Paw Paw. Finding Aid.

 

  • Bullock, Miles Wayne (1844-1914) Family Papers, 1799-1911. Papers include: photographs; obituaries; autobiographical sketch; diaries, 1862, 1864-1865; and correspondence with Company G, New York 61st Regiment comrades about feelings of soldiers and civilians during Civil War, superior officers, armistice, battles of Fredericksburg (Va.), Gettysburg (PA) Harper's Ferry (W.Va.), and Sharpsburg (Md.). Bio: Resident of Sherburne (NY), alter Marion (MI), served in New York 61st Regiment, Company G. In 1866, he moved to Marion (MI). Finding aid available.

 

  • Butterfield, George Washington, 1843-1919. Papers, 1836, 1986. Approximately 1 cubic ft. (in 1 carton and 1 oversized folder). IL Papers, include: correspondence, 1861-1912 and undated; diaries, 1862-1865 and undated; photographs (some of which are photocopies); newspaper clippings; and publications about the Civil War or G.A.R. His Civil War materials describe his service in the Michigan Infantry 22nd Regiment Co. B, camp life, marches, the poor character traits of officers, and living conditions in Georgia, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Bio: Butterfield was born on June 7, 1843, in Utica (MI). He enlisted in the Michigan Infantry 22nd Regiment, Company B in 1862, transferring a week later to the U.S. Signal Corps. He died on Oct. 7, 1919. Finding Aid.

 

  • Carter, Theodore B. Diaries, 1864-1865. 2 vol. Diaries written after being disabled in some fashion, whether wound or disease is unclear. Initially at home with parents during the winter of 1864, Carter was later assigned to the Veteran Reserve Corps. Brief entries regarding health, correspondence, and daily routines. Includes brief service history. Bio: Carter was a resident of Lowell (MI) who served with the 26th Michigan Infantry, Company I.

 

  • Champion, Julius, 1845- Diary, 1864-1865. 1 item (34 pages). Typescript of diary with entries about travel, duties, and daily activities, and also descriptions of several battles during Sherman's March to the Sea. Includes brief service history. Bio: Champion served with the 1st Michigan Light Artillery, Battery B.

 

  • Chet (Union Soldier). Letter, 1861 Aug 7. 1 item (3 pages). Letter written to a "friend." Relates news of mutual acquaintances, rumors of unit reorganizations that would allow troops to return home, estimates total Confederate forces at 240,000, and rumors that many slaves are in the Confederate cavalry and are escaping. Bio: Served with the 2nd Michigan Infantry.

 

  • Cleaveland, Fitch W. Correspondence, 1862, 1866. 1 folder. Correspondence (photocopies), 1862-1866, between Ohio Civil War soldier Cleaveland and his future wife, Ellen L. Brisbee, in Wood County (Ohio). One letter from him while stationed in Louisville (Ky.) to Brisbee, dated Sept. 30, 1862, describes the shooting of Gen. Nelson by Jefferson Davis and news of Cleaveland's unit (which is unspecified). Bio: Cleaveland served in an unknown Ohio unit during the Civil War. In 1865, Cleaveland moved to Isabella County (MI). He later returned to Wood County (Ohio) to marry Ellen L. Brisbee in Nov. 1866. They then moved to Isabella County (MI).

 

  • Collins, George W. Letters, 1862-1863. 7 items. Letters with details of daily activity, unit travel, and foraging. Includes brief service biography. Bio: Collins was a resident of Hamilton, MI; served with the Michigan 4th Cavalry, Co. C.; and died at Murfreesboro, TN in 1863.

 

  • Courson, Hamilton. Letter, 1863 Mar. 9. 1 item (3 pages). Letter to Charles Hubbard, Sr. relating the harddships of soldiering. Includes brief service history. Bio: Courson was a resident of Georgetown, MI who served with the 5th Michigan Cavalry, Company B.

 

  • Craig, John. Letters, 1863. 2 items. Letter and fragment of a second. Relates details of daily routine. Bio: Craig served in the 12th NY Infantry, Company D.

 

  • Crury, O.S. Letters, 1864 Mar. 2 items. Letters to wife and children describing the daily routine, negroes enlisting, a description of the area around Chattanooga, TN, and local women. Bio: Union soldier in the Civil War.

 

  • Currie, George E. Papers, 1861, 1960. 3 folders. Papers include: typed transcriptions of 12 of Currie's Civil War letters, Dec. 20, 1861-Aug. 17, 1864, from his service in the Federal Mississippi Ram Fleet and the Mississippi Marine Brigade. His letters discuss the fleet; various battles; the suffering of the wounded; marches; the death of Col. Charles Ellet (June 20, 1862); various towns and barracks; his black servant, Bill; southern blacks (Nov. 28, 1862); composition of the brigade; grounds of Benton barracks; black boathands (June 30, 1863); U.S. Colored Troops (July 6, 1864); the wounded on board, including civilians and women; and the nursing of federal troops by Southern women (Aug. 16, 1864). There is a 1960 typed draft of "Guerrilla warfare along western waters: being chiefly the experiences of George E. Currie in the Mississippi Ram Fleet and Marine Brigade, 1861-1864" by Norman E. Clarke, Sr. See also, the book, "Warfare along the Mississippi." Lastly, there is a 497 page volume of typed letters, Sept. 10, 1863-July 6, 1864, describing the Battle of Pea Ridge (Ark.) and being on the U.S. Steamers Diana and Ram Dingo. Bio: Currie was a Capt. in the 59th Illinois Volunteers, Co. F, and joined the Federal Mississippi Ram Fleet in Dec. 1891. He served as commander of the U.S. Steamers Diana and D. J. Adams.

 

  • Curtiss, Charles H., 1837- Papers, 1854, 1926. 1.5 cubic ft. (in 3 boxes), IL Papers, 1854-1926, include: four diaries, 1860-1864, and letters discussing marches, battles, Gen McClellan, Gen. Hooker, the treatment of soldiers, and cadets shot for desertion. Eleven muster rolls of Co. E, 7th Michigan Infantry, 1861-1863, and nine monthly returns, 1862- 1863, are housed separately due to their size. Lists of military supplies and men killed in action are noted in the 1864 diary. Photographs of Curtiss and one of his wife, Fannie, in an 1855 New Testament, and an illustration of their homestead are also included. Bio: Charles Henry Curtiss, also spelled Curtis, was born in 1837 in Huntington (Shelton, Conn.). He moved to Detroit (MI) in 1855. He served as Quartermaster Sergeant of the 7th Infantry, beginning in 1861. He was commission as a 2nd Lt. in Jan. 1863 and as a 1st Lt. in Feb. 1863. By Aug. 1863 he was Aide-de-camp to Col. Carrol. He was commissioned as a Captain in March 1864. In June 1864, he was honorably discharged. Finding aid and item-level index cards available.

 

  • Curtiss, Sheldon R. Diary of Sheldon R. Curtiss : through his three years of service in the Civil War. [typed transcript with photos] [S.l. :S.n., 1970?] Also includes copy of his service record. Bio: Curtiss enlisted in Company M, 6th Michigan Cavalry on Sept. 19, 1862 at Berlin at age 23. He was mustered on Oct. 11, 1862 and was a prisoner of war from July 11 to Dec. 1864 at Andersonville, Ga. He was discharged at Fort Leavenworth (Kan.) on Oct. 10, 1865.

 

  • Cutcheon, Byron M. 1836-1908. Reminiscence, ca. 1885. 1 item (2 pages). Reminiscence includes a brief summation of his career up until the fall of 1863 and a detailed account of the death of a Colonel Smith. Includes a brief service history. Bio: Resident of Ypsilanti, MI; served with 20th Mich Inf, Co B; eventually promoted to Colonel.

 

  • Daniels, John. Marching Through Georgia, 1864-1865. 1 item (31 pages). Photocopy of a typescript of a diary with brief but detailed entries from mustering in to mustering out; movements; and the countryside of Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina; burning of the countryside; food; a battle at Savannah; and railroads. Includes brief service history. Bio: Daniels served with the 13th Michigan Infantry Regiment, Company C.

 

  • Delano, Frederick. Letter, 1864 July 19. 1 item (2 pages). Letter describing the trials of a soldier's life and illness. Includes a brief service history. Bio: Delano served with the 3rd Michigan Cavalry, Company G.

 

  • Doherty, William. Letter, April 10, [1865], from Doherty at Summit Point (Va.) to his parents in Canada on his recent enlistment into the army and about destruction in the South. Bio: Doherty enlisted in Company M, 5th Michigan Cavalry on Feb. 15, 1865 at Detroit at age 21. He was mustered on Feb. 15, 1865. He served as a substitute for Richard Gregory. He transferred to Company M, 7th Cavalry and was honorably discharged at Fort Leavenworth (Kan.) on July 14, 1865. (In the regimental history he is listed as William Dougherty.)

 

  • Douglass, George, 1843- Biographical Affadavit, 1914. 1 folder. Biographical affadavit, Jan. 1, 1914, apparently to prove his age without having a birth certificate. He served in the Civil War, but not in a Michigan unit. Bio: Douglass was born on Oct. 27, 1843 in New York (state) and moved to Vergennes Township (Kent County, MI) with his father in 1853. Douglass served in the Civil War and was discharged in Tennessee at age 20 on Dec. 29, 1863.

 

  • Dove, William. Letter, 1864. 1 item (11 pages). Photocopy and transcript of a letter to Horace O. Bigelow regarding the death of his son Olney. Contains additional information added later by several people. Includes brief service histories. <;li> Drake, David A. Correspondence, 1865, 1883. 1 folder. Correspondence includes a Civil War letter from Alonzo D. Holland in Goldsboro (NC) to "Friend Drake" in Wiota (Isabella County, MI), dated March 31, 1865, and a typed transcription. The letter discusses North Carolina, Sherman's Army, and Rebels. There is also a photocopy of Holland's service record is also included. Bio: Holland enlisted in Company M, 1st Michigan Engineers and Mechanics Regiment on Sept. 22, 1863 at Coe (MI), at age 21. He was mustered on Oct. 7, 1863, promoted to Corporal on Aug. 1, 1865, and mustered out at Nashville (TN) on Sept. 22, 1865.

 

  • Dunbar, Richard J., transcriber. Civil War letters by great uncles of Winsor S. Dunbar..., 1862, 1978. 1 v. (in 1 folder), IL Photocopied and transcribed Civil War letters of brothers George H. Wood, William P. Wood (also known as Billy), and Charles W. Wood, 1862-1865, to their parents and siblings, and letters from their father, George Folger Wood, in the 1870s. There is also a photograph of the three brothers and family genealogy. Bio: The three Wood brothers all apparently joined Wisconsin regiments in Madison (WI) when their parents lived in Sauk County (WI).

 

  • Dunkenlau, Herman. Collection, 1863-1999. Includes original letter, envelope, and modern transcript of Dec. 25, 1863 letter from Dunkenlau at camp by Brandy Station (Va.) to his unnamed brother-in-law. Letter about Lee's armies, retreats, a skirmish, the capture of lumber, criticism of Meade, bad weather, and regards to his family. Also included is a modern, hand drawn map of Brandy Station area.

 

  • Edmonds, S. Emma E. (Seelye) (Sarah Emma Evelyn), 1841-1898. Papers, 1885-1897. Seven letters to R. H. Halsted about her membership and participation in the G.A.R., efforts to get increased pension due to being injured while delivering mail during the Civil War under the name of Franklin Thompson, photograph, newspaper clippings. Bio: Edmonds was bron in New Brunswick, Canada. She enlisted in 2nd Michigan Volunteers and fought in the Civil War as a man named Frank(lin) Thompson.

 

  • Edson, Edgar. Letter, 1862 Sept 27. 1 item (2 pages). Photocopy of a typescript of a letter to his mother and sister describing the aftermath of a battle. Includes a brief service history. Bio: Resident of Parma, MI; served with the 20th Michigan Infantry, Co. E; later a resident of Ann Arbor, MI

 

  • Ely, Ralph, 1819-1893. Papers, 1863-1943, 1861-1869. 9 items. Papers, include: diary, transcript of diary, and genealogies. Diary discusses health, unit movements, daily activities, negroes, and contains detailed descriptions of scouting activities. Includes brief service history. Born in New York State in 1819, Ely moved to Ionia County (MI) in 1846; moved to Alma (MI) in 1854, and served with the 8th Michigan Infantry, Company C. He rose to the rank of brigadier general. Ely became a state senator in 1873.

 

  • Ely, Ralph (1819-1883) "With the wandering regiment." Transcript (photocopy) of manuscript, edited by Dr. George M. Blackburn (1926- ) giving daily history of Capt. Ralph Ely during the Southern Rebellion, May 20, 1861-April 1, 1864. Published by CMU Press, 1965. 105 p.

 

  • Ely, Ralph (1819-1883) "With the wandering regiment." Book form of transcribed manuscript, edited by Dr. George M. Blackburn (1926- ) giving daily history of Capt. Ralph Ely during the Southern Rebellion, May 2, 1861-April 1, 1864. Published by CMU Press, 1965. 105 p.

 

  • Ensign, Daniel J., d. 1862. Letters, 1861-1862. 4 items. Letters to sister, Amanda, while stationed at Arlington Heights. Topics include: 1st Bull Run, Virginia women, local Michigan news, and he predicts the end of the war by the spring of 1862. Also, brief service record. Bio: Resident of Genessee County, MI; served with the 2nd Michigan Inf., Co. F; died in 1862 from a wound received at Fair Oaks, VA.

 

  • Eunice, c Mother. Letter, 1863 Jan. 15. 1 item (4 pages). Letter written to Lydia of Climax, MI, which discusses Eunice's sons in the war and her attitude toward it.

 

  • Farnill, John S., d.1864. Letters, 1862-1875. 123 items. Collection includes letters from John telling of his experiences in the Civil War and letters from people who served with John. Bio: Farnill, from Pittsfield (MI), was a Corporal in Company F, 6th Michigan Cavalry. He was taken prisoner on July 4, 1863 and died at Annapolis, MD on December 27, 1864.

 

  • Follmer, J. D. Three years in the army, 1862-1865. 1 vol. (156 pages). Diary with a detailed narrative style. Explains much about what he feels and why he thinks events occur. Bio: Born in Milton, PA; served with the 16th Penn Cav, Co F; Michigan lumberman after the war; retired to Schoolcraft, MI

 

  • Fordyce Family. Correspondence, 1854-1873. 13 items. Correspondence regarding topics such as family news and the Civil War. Bio: The Fordyce Family was from Greene and Washington Counties (PA).

 

  • Frank. Correspondence, 1861. 1 folder. A four-page letter addressed to "dear friend Minna," dated Oct. 4, 1861, which gives a detailed account of encounters with Confederate troops and cavalry, and aspects of soldiers' lives. Frank mentions that two regiments from Winchester (Va.) reached Reamney (sp?). He also mentions Joe and Minna's parents. The letter was written from Newcreek, Hampshire County (WV) by Frank, a Union soldier.

 

  • Gillaspie, Ira Myron Bailey, 1837-1897. Diary of Ira M. B. Gillaspie Co C Mich Inft writen in the arme 1861-62 and 3, 1861-1958, bulk, 1861-1863. 2 items. Diary primarily relating daily activities. Discusses illness, exhibits a negative attitude towards blacks, and has an account of the battle of Stone River (Murfreesboro, TN). Includes brief service history. Bio: Gillaspie was a resident of St. Joseph County, MI

 

  • Gillis, Simeon. Diary, 1862-1864. 1 v. (48 pages). Unsigned typescript of diary, edited by Jim Tuma and Martin Sugden. Diary very briefly describes marches, skirmishes, battles, unit movements, and weather. Bio: Gillis lived near Bryan (Ohio) and was a soldier in Ohio Infantry Regiment, 68th, 3rd Division.

 

  • Gould, Amos, 1808-1882. Family Papers, 1828, 1936. 65 cubic ft. (in 145 boxes and several Oversized vols.). Family papers include Ebenezer Gould's papers which contain Civil War era correspondence with his wife, children, and brother, Amos; business correspondence; a family scrapbook; and miscellaneous, 1845-1936. Bio: Ebenezer Gould married Irene Beach in 1845. They had several children together. He was honorably discharged as a Colonel of the Michigan Cavalry, 5th Regiment in 1864. Finding aid available.

 

  • Green, Thomas. Letter, 1863 Sept. 30. 1 item (4 pages). Photocopy of a letter from Green, a Union soldier, discussing a soldier's life and the Battle of Chattanooga.

 

  • Gunn, Charles A. Letter, 1863 Feb. 4. 2 items. Letter to George, describing the trip from Jackson, MI to the front near Washington. Discusses provost duty and finding troops at whorehouses and throwing them in the "slave pits." Bio: Resident of Vevay, Ingham County, MI; served with the 26th Michigan Infantry, Company H.

 

  • Hadley, L. Papers, 1863. 4 items. Letters and excerpts from diary discussing cavalry operations, gunboats, and an engagement with black troops. Bio: Hadley served with the Union cavalry.

 

  • Hamlin, John Henry, d.1891. Letters, 1864. 2 items. Letters to friend James W. Bentley of the MI 7th Cavalry, while healing from an eye wound in New York. Includes brief service history. Bio: Resident of Eaton Rapids, MI; enlisted with the New York Lincoln Cavalry, 1861; promoted and commissioned in MI 7th Cavalry, Co. F; died in 1891.

 

  • Hall, Eugene Z., d.1864. Letter, 1862 Oct. 13. 1 item (4 pages). Letter to Carrie Clarck relating unit movements from Jackson, MI to Washington, DC. Upset about lack of Union support in Baltimore. Includes brief service history. Bio: Resident of Dexter, MI; served with the 20th Michigan Infantry. Co. D; died in 1864; buried in Arlington, VA.

 

  • Hammond, Harry. Letter, 1862, June 7. 2 items. Letter to his wife, original and typescript, which discusses communication between the Union and Confederate armies, a dispatch to R. E. Lee, Richmond, and asks her to write more often. Bio: Major Hammond was brigade quartermaster for McGowan's brigade, 14th South Carolina Infantry.

 

  • Hewitt, John W., 1842- Diary, 1863, 1864. 1 v. (140 p., in 1 folder). Diary, 1863-1864, with brief entries describing the weather, marching orders, drills, and some service history. Also, brief financial accounts for clothes, miscellaneous sketches, and a photocopy of his service history. Bio: Hewitt, a resident of Hillsdale County (MI), enlisted in the Michigan Infantry 4th Regiment, Company E in 1861 at age 19. He was mustered out in 1864.

 

  • Higbee, Frederick, 1833- Correspondence, 1864. 1 folder. A three-page letter, dated Feb. 8, 1864, written in Camp Bulick (Va.) to "Friend Clarcey" (Whitney), describes a soldier's life, Rebels, a recent battle, and plans for life after the war. There is also a photocopy of Higbee's service record. Bio: Higbee was a resident of Newaygo County (MI). He enlisted in the Michigan Infantry Regiment, 3rd, Company H in 1861 at age 28. He was promoted to Corporal on Nov. 10, 1861, Sergeant on Oct. 27, 1862, and mustered out in Detroit in 1864.

 

  • Hill, William Alfred, 1846- Autobiography, 1846-1921. Relates his participation in the Civil War, farming, social, and religious life in Missouri. Bio: Farmer from Warren County (Mo.), served in Company E, 6th Missouri State Militia.

 

  • Hitchcock, E. E. Correspondence, 1862. 1 folder. Letter (photostat) sent from Washington (D.C.) to "dear sister," dated Oct. 20, 1862, and the typescript. The letter describes his life as a soldier, winter quarters, conditions near battlefields, and stories about blacks. Mentions Martha Hazerd at home; Dwight James, the sister's sweetheart; and a man named Tower in the Maryland (Infantry?), 7th Regiment. Bio: Notes added to the transcript state that Hitchcock, a Union soldier, was killed near the Potomac River. Dwight James survived to marry Hitchock's sister.

 

  • Hodskin. Charles Horace, 1837-1905. Papers, 1861, 1905. .25 cubic ft. (in 1 box). IL Papers, 1861-1905 and undated, include biographical material, certificates, Civil War diary, and correspondence, and daguerreotypes. The Civil War materials, 1861-1864, discuss the weather; drills; skirmishes; major General A. E. Burnside's military failures; heavy losses; U.S. Colored Troops; and marches to Bardston, Lebanon, Jamestown, and Memphis (TN). Bio: Hodskin, born on Aug. 22, 1837, moved to Battle Creek (MI). He served in the Michigan Infantry 2nd Regiment during the Civil War and was eventually honorably discharged with the rank of Captain in 1864. He died on Feb. 18, 1905, in Manistee (MI).

 

  • Hopkins, Charles C., 1839- Correspondence, 1861. 1 folder, IL One three-page letter to "dear cousin," dated Sept. 5, 1861, describes daily activities, how much he enjoys killing Rebels, and that he thinks the war will end in eight months. The letterhead is illustrated with a colored drawing of a Civil War soldier in uniform. There is also a photocopy of his service record. Bio: In 1861, at age 22, Hopkins enlisted in the Michigan Infantry Regiment, 2nd, Company H. He reenlisted in 1863 and was discharged in Detroit in 1864. He survived numerous battles.

 

  • Hopkins, Mordecai L. Papers, 1855-1891, include letters by Hopkins about politics, 1855- 1860, slavery, 1857, letter to his wife, March 1862. Letters to Hopkins from William H. Drake and T. Eastman with general Civil War news. In Mordecai L. Hopkins Papers. Also partial letter from Ananias Worden about the draft agreement, 1863, letter to Mort from George H. Osgood about Rebels, undated. Bio: Drake served in Company A, 3rd Michigan Infantry. He was discharged for disability at Washington, D.C., on Jan. 13, 1863 at age 28. Hopkins was a Michigan Senator from Ottawa County, 1855-1856. No information available on Eastman or Osgood. Worden was a friend and post office special agent under Pres. Lincoln.

 

  • Howard, Worthington, d.1862. Papers, 1861, 1930. 1 folder, IL Papers, 1861-1930, include tintype and obituary of his sister, Sarah A. Howard Fuller (1842-1930). Most of the collection is letters from the Military Hospital at Fort Lyon (Va.) addressed to "Dear Sister Sarah," which describe family news, religion, that the war will be short, Howard's illness, and debt. There is also a letter from brother Frank Good to Sarah. Also included is a photocopied brief service history of Howard. Bio: Howard, a resident of Shiawassee County (MI), served in the Michigan Infantry, 5th Regiment, Company H. He attained the rank of Sergeant. In 1862, he died of disease in the Military Hospital at Fort Lyon (Vir.). His sister Sarah A. Howard married Calvin M. Fuller at age 21 and they had six children. She was a pioneer of Antrim Township (MI) She died in 1930.

 

  • Hulbert, Edward J. Family Correspondence, 1861, 1863. 1 folder. Family correspondence to Civil War soldier Hez Hulbert from brothers Ed(ward) J. and Charles Hulbert, and their mother, with news of family and Grand Rapids (MI). Bio: Ed Hulbert was in music school in Grand Rapids (MI) from 1861 to 1863.

 

  • Hunter, William H. Letter, March 29, 1862. Letter from Hunter at Ship Island to his mother expressing satisfaction with military service, telling about Rebels coming by small boats from New Orleans (La.) to force all men and boys to enlist. Bio: Hunter served in the 6th Battery, Massachusetts Volunteers.

 

  • Hurd, J. B. Letter, 1864. Letter from Hurd in Washington, D.C., to Fabeus Miles in Hartford (MI), giving his personal reflections about his present life and some notes on Washington during the Civil War.

 

  • Jennings, William C. Correspondence, 1862. 1 folder. A three-page letter, dated Aug. 17, 1862, addressed to "Brother" who had just enlisted. Jennings mentions his smart little daughter, Addey Idelan. The letter was sent from North Springfield (IL). A note on the envelope and the back of the letter states the letter was retrieved from a Rebel knapsack after the Battle of South Mountain.

 

  • Kellogg, J. W. Correspondence, 1862. 1 folder. A three-page letter, dated May 20, 1862, addressed to Carrie M. Clark and mailed from Kent County (Va.), describing the tedium of being of being a soldier and begging for her to respond.

 

  • King, Doris L. Family Papers, 1822, 1877. 1 folder. Family papers, 1822-1877 and undated, include: Civil War letters between Jane and William Betts and their son, Irving J. Metcalf, 1862-1866. One of Irving's letters graphically decribes the hanging of a murderer on Feb. 9, 1862, which his Civil War company was ordered to witness. A letter from Jane's aunt notes the assassination of President Lincoln, 1865. Bio: Doris L. King died in 1989. The collection centers around Jane (Young) Metcalf Betts and her husbands, Taber Metcalf and William Betts, and son, Irving Metcalf of Burr Oak and St. Joseph County (MI), later of East Cleveland, Ohio and their relatives. Irving served in Company D, 11th Michigan Infantry during the Civil War. A detailed inventory is included with the family correspondence.

 

  • Kirkbride, George W., 1827- Papers, 1860, 1895. 7 folder, IL Papers, 1860-1895 and undated, include: a Diary, Aug.-Dec. 1863, describing marches, mud, skirmishes, and hardships; Correspondence, 1863, listing the names of battery divisions of the Ohio Infantry Regiment, 188th, and the men for whom they were named; and a note, 1888, to his sister, Mrs. G. W. Kirkbride, in Big Rapids (MI) about his sore legs and feet from marching. There are also three maps he drew of Kingston (TN?), London (TN), and Tennessee in general; 13 notebooks and account books, 1860-1886; and a carte de visite, probably of Kirkbride. Momentos include a small GAR flag. Bio: Kirkbride (born 1827) was a Lieutenant in the Ohio Infantry Regiment, 118th. In 1865, he was granted a retail dealer license for the town of Kopth in Anglaize County (Ohio).

 

  • Kliee, Frederick. Correspondence, 1864. 1 folder. A four-page letter, dated April 4, 1864, addressed to his nephews, Charles and Willie, describing military actions and Suffolk and Norfolk (Va.). Bio: Kliee was probably a Union soldier in a cavalry unit.

 

  • Kneeland, Samuel M., 1838- Papers, 1864, 1905. 1 folder, IL Papers, 1864-1865 and 1905. Includes a carbon letter notebook, Sept. 26-Dec. 23, 1864, with copies of letters sent from Headquarters District, North Alabama at Decatur, Huntsville, and other locations. Loose correspondence is dated Sept. 30, 1864 (two letters), December 21-23, 1864, and Dec. 23, 1865. The Dec. 22, 1864 letter was sent from the Steamer Stone River. U.S. Military telegrams dated Dec. 18-20, 1864 and undated; two almost illegible notes, rejecting the offer of Confederate Brigadier General Abraham Buford to surrender Huntsville; miscellaneous GAR momentos; an eight-page typed article on the Tufts Family of Medford, 1905; and a carte de visite. probably of Kneeland are also included. Bio: Kneeland, a resident of Tecumseh (MI), entered the service in August 1862 as a 1st Sergeant of the Michigan Infantry Regiment, 18th, Company I. He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant in December 1862; served as Aide-de-Camp on the staff of Brigadier General Gillmore, January-June 1863; and was promoted to 1st Lieutenant of Company E in December 1863. He served as Aide-de-Camp on the staff of General Gordon Granger, December 1864-June 1865. He was mustered out June 1865 at Nashville (TN).

 

  • Le Conte, John Lawrence, 1825-1883. Family Correspondence, 1860, 1866. 1 folder. Four photocopied letters from and to Le Conte and his cousin, Mathilda (Tillie) Harden, later the wife of Sumner Stevens, in Macon (Ga.). Letters discuss politics, slaves, freedmen, economics of Southern life, and North versus South. There is also a copy of Le Conte's biography. Bio: Le Conte (1825-1883) was recognized at home and abroad as the greatest entomologist that America ever produced. He was married to Helen. His cousin, Mathilda Harden, married Sumner Stevens and lived in Macon (Ga.).

 

  • Letters, 1861. 2 items. Unsigned letters to "Friend R." Stationary has Union flag and illustration of Maj. Gen. George McClellan. Interesting content includes: use of balloons for reconnaissance, dealing with rebel snipers, and bets that the war will be over within two months. The writer suspects they will lose their money.

 

  • Limbocker, William E., 1835-1863. Diary, 1861. 1 v. (in 1 folder). Diary, June-Aug. 1861, describes camp life near Washington; picket duty; battles; skirmishes; arrival in Fairfax (Va.); desertions; the destruction of his regiment at Gettysburg on July 21, 1861; forming a brigade under Gen Sherman; taking Rebel prisoners; the destruction of Virginia; a parade before Gen. Scott, Pres. Lincoln, and Gen. McClellan; the capture of Fort Scott; burning of wheat and Rebel homes; his broken hand; and a grand review in front of Lincoln and McClellan. Bio: Limbocker or Lenbocker, enlisted and was mustered in Co. F, 4th Michigan Infantry at age 26 in Adrian, Lenawee County (MI) in June 1861. He was wounded in action in June 1862 and taken prisoner at Gettysburg (PA) on July 2, 1863. He was killed on Oct. 25, 1863 at Belle Island, Richmond (Va.) by enemy's guard, while on police duty.

 

  • Little, Andrew, 1835-1921. Papers, 1821-1894. 35 items. Correspondence, typescripts of war diary, land records, receipts, and photo. Bio: Little was born in Wayne County, OH and he moved to Ionia County, MI in 1855. He served as a Lieutenant in Company A, 13th Michigan Infantry.

 

  • Macomber, Dexter M., 1840- Diary, 1861, 1891. Photocopy of a transcript of a diary, 1861-1864, describing army life, position and location of troops, commanding officers, his personal experiences, skirmishes, battles, and a description of Gen. George Custer. In the back is a speech he gave entitled, "Army Horse or Boots and Saddle." Also, a copy of his service record. Bio: A resident of Oakland County (MI), Macomber enlisted and was mustered in Co. C, Michigan 1st Cavalry in Northville, Wayne County (MI), in Sept. 1861. He was taken prisoner at Bull Run (Va.) in 1862. Paroled, he re-enlisted and was mustered in Dec. 1863. He was transferred to Company H in March 1864. In June 1864, He was taken prisoner at Trevillian Station (Va.). He was again paroled and in August 1864, he was taken prisoner at Weldon Railroad (Va.). He was paroled for the last time in March 1865 and discharged in June 1865 in Ohio.

 

  • Marvin, Charles Wakeman, 1824-1902. Papers, 1850-1944. Includes letter form Surgeon- in-chief of the 24th Michigan Infantry, March 10, 1865, concerning discharge of soldiers for physical disability; Dr. Marvin's muster-in-roll, discharge papers, and monthly returns on clothing. Bio: Assist. Surgeon of the 24th Michigan Infantry during the Civil War.

 

  • Mason, James E., 1843- Correspondence, 186u. 1 folder. Letter, (undated, but from the Civil War) from Camp Benton to Battle Creek (MI), describing camp life, his horse, the weather, landscape, death of two men, and the quality of Southern soil. There is also a photocopy of his service record. Bio: Mason was part of the Merril Horse Unit, which formed in Battle Creek (MI) but was not accepted for use by the governor of Michigan. Instead, the unit later became part of the Missouri 2nd Cavalry, Company H. Mason, from Calhoun County (MI), enlisted at the age of 18 in Aug. 1861. He was mustered in Sept. 1861. He re-enlisted in Jan. 1864 and was mustered in June 1864. He was promoted to Corporal in Dec. 1864 and mustered out at Nashville (TN) in 1865. After the war, he lived in Cincinnati (Ohio).

 

  • Mathewson, John B., 1844- Correspondence, 1864. 1 folder. Letter, dated Aug. 11, 1864, from Lt. Mathewson in Petersburg (Va.) to his "dear cousin Mary," describing fights with Rebels in unnamed locations, and discussing his chances of being discharged. The letter was written on U.S. Sanitary Commission letterhead. There is also a photocopy of his service record. Bio: Mathewson enlisted in Co. I, 8th Michigan Infantry in Aug. 1862 in Grand Rapids (MI) at age 18. Mustered in Feb. 1862, he participated in the following battles: James Island (SC), Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg (Va.), Vicksburg (MS), Jacksonville (MS), Blue Springs, and the Siege of Knoxville (TN). He was either enlisted as or at some time promoted to Lt. He was discharged in Petersburg (Va.) in Feb. 1865.

 

  • McCormick, Michael, 1836- Diary/Poem, 186u. 1 folder. Letter, dated January 24 (during the Civil War), from "Mike", describing the endurance of Michigan men in the war. The reverse side of the letter has a war poem in which five men from Co. H of the 6th Michigan Infantry are mentioned, including: Horace Herridon or Henderson, George Perrine, George W. Charter, George W. Jones, and Royal H. King. Photocopies of McCormick's and their service records are included. Bio: McCormick, from Charlotte (Eaton County, MI), enlisted and was mustered in Co. H, 6th Michigan Infantry in Aug. 1861 at Charlotte at age 25. He was wounded in action in May 1863. He was discharged to accept a commission as 2nd Lt. in the 99th U.S. Colored Infantry. He was mustered out and honorably discharged in May 1865. The other men were all from Eaton County (MI) and all members of the 6th Michigan Infantry, Company H. All but Perrine died of disease in 1862.

 

  • McDonald, George, 1842-1865. Correspondence, 1864. Letter and envelope, dated Aug. 11, 1864, addressed to Mrs. Nancie Rowland, Howell (Livingston County, MI) and "Dear sister and brother" from McDonald in Headquarters Dept. of Cumberland near Atlanta (Ga.), camp of the 6th Michigan Veteran Infantry. The letter notes that McDonald is alive and well, that he received letters from family, that he hopes God will save him, the war may continue for a long time, he hates war, and many Rebels were forced into service by the attitude of Southern women. Bio: McDonald enlisted in Co. F, 6th Michigan Infantry in March 1864 in Charlotte (Eaton County, MI) at the age of 22. He was mustered in April 1864 and transferred to Co. H in May 1864. He died of disease at Fort Gaines (Ala.) on June 10, 1865 and is buried in the National Cemetery at Mobile (Ala.), Grave No. 602.

 

  • McDowell, John E., d. ca.1995. Papers, 1968, 1994. 1.5 cubic ft. (in 2 boxes). IL Papers, 1968-1994 and undated, include his notes, unpublished papers, and correspondence about Charles H. Salter, a Detroit Civil War veteran, and Ulysses S. Grant. Bio: McDowell owned his own tax consulting/accounting service in Indian River (MI). Finding Aid.

 

  • McNeal, Luther F., 1830-1863. Correspondence, 1863. 1 folder. Letters (photocopies) dated July 13, Aug. 2, and Sept. 8, 1863 from the Civil War camp of an Iowa Captain in Vicksburg (MS) to his "Folks at home." He criticizes some army generals as "ignorant demagogues, who are more for their personal aggrandizement than for their country;" describes sentiments of captured Rebels; that he hopes to quit in March or April; and the death of his son, Willie. Willie and his sister, Lucy, were visiting their father, who was recovering from illness. Willie caught the illness, died, and was buried in MS Also includes notes about his service record. Bio: On Jan. 31, 1862, McNeal enlisted as a 1st Sgt. in the 17th Regiment, Iowa Volunteer Infantry at the age of 32. His residence was Keokuk (NY). He was mustered on March 5, 1862 and promoted to 2nd Lt. on Dec. 10, 1862, and Captain on June 25, 1863. He was severely wounded at Missionary Ridge (TN) on Nov. 25, 1863 and died of his wounds on Dec. 19, 1863.

 

  • Montgomery, Thomas S. Eleven months experience in a Rebel prison. Typed manuscript (copy) (20 p.). 1 folder. Typed transcript of the story of his life before the war, his military record, battles, being taken prisoner at the Battle of Bull Run, life in Libby Prison and the U.S. Hotel in Tuscaloosa (MS), treatment of soldiers, wounding of his thigh, re-enlistment, re-capture, food and supplies, and being paroled. A photocopy of his service record is also included. Bio: Montgomery was born April 25, 1836 in Angelica (Allegany County, NY). In April 1861, he enlisted in Co. A, 1st Michigan Infantry. He was mustered in May 1861, taken prisoner at Bull Run (Va) July 21, 1861, and discharged at Detroit, July 1862. He re-enlisted in the 5th Michigan Infantry, Co. G in 1862 at the age of 28. He was mustered in Sept. 1862, wounded at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863 and promoted to Corporal. He was transferred to the Invalid Corps on Oct. 20, 1863 and discharged on disability at Washington, D.C. on Aug. 5, 1865, from the 3rd Co., 2nd Battalion, V.R.C. (Veteran Reserve Corps).

 

  • Mooney, L. M. Papers, 1864. 1 folder. Papers include 2 undated picket passes, 1 pass for medical treatment,dated Dec. 14, 1864; a report for duty pass, dated Nov. 12, 1864; and two letters from the Mechanics Messhouse No. 10 in Nashville (TN), dated Nov. 26, 1864 and undated. The letters to his children describe his travel hardships when the train was attacked by Southern sympathizers, guerrilla wars, shooting and killing on the street at night, and his work as a draftsman in the Super Master Mechanics office in Nashville (TN). Bio: Mooney was a Michigan man. He was a Union draftsman and mechanic with two children. His unit is unidentified.

 

  • Muencher, Emory W., 1834- Papers, 1850, 1915. .75 cubic foot (in 2 boxes). Papers, 1850-1915 and undated, include his handwritten Personal Journals, documenting his life and that of the 30th Ohio Infantry, which were written after the Civil War. There are Personal Journals, 1856-1860, 1848-1864, and 1864-1865 and typed transcriptions, 1856- 1860 and 1864-1865. Newspaper clippings, 1862-1863, 1901, undated, are about him, Manistee (MI), and Ohio Civil War Infantry regiments, including the 30th, 36th, 4th, 98th, and 126th. Bio: Muencher (1834-), a music teacher from Mount Vernon (Ohio), served in Co. I, 30th Ohio Infantry. On Dec. 27, 1864 he was commissioned as a Lt. Col. By the early 1900s he lived in Manistee (MI) where he was involved with the G.A.R. and Civil War veterans reunions. A finding aid is available to assist researchers.

 

  • Norton, Oliver W. Papers, 1910-1916. 1 v. Scrapbook with correspondence describing the attack and defense of Little Big Top (Gettysburg) on July 2, 1863 (written in 1913); the role of Strong Vincent in the Battle of Gettysburg, and other materials by Vincent. Bio: Private in 83rd Pennsylvania Volunteers.

 

  • Oberlin, Henry, 1842-1864. Diary, 1864 [mimeographed copy of typescript] Diary with brief entries describing weather, camp life, troop movements, and military engagements. Includes an introduction by Ivan A. Conger, copyist of the original diary. Bio: Seville (Gratiot County, MI) resident who served in Company E, 23rd Michigan Infantry during the Civil War until his death from wounds received in action at Franklin (TN).

 

  • Pettit, Abram M., 1835- Papers, 1861, 1863. 1 folder, IL Papers include: two letters and two notebooks, a medal, a photocopy of his service record, and a small photograph of Pettit in uniform. The medal, with George Washington's profile, is ringed with "George Washington born February 22, 1752" on the front and the back states "Serg. A. M. Pettit Co. B 2nd Regt. Michigan Volunteers War of 1861 Hudson MI" The account books of May-July 1862 list sick soldiers. The account book of Dec. 1861-April 11, 1863 includes a diary of brief statements and accounts. A letter, dated August 16, 1861, is written on letterhead showing Fort Monroe and a military map of Maryland and Virginia. The letter is from a camp near Arlington (Va.) and it is addressed to "Dear Parents." It describes Pettit's fellow soldiers' feelings about war and homesickness. The second letter, dated August 11, 1862, is a recommendation from 1st Lt. Tilson C. Barden, written near Harrison's Landing (Va.) to Gov. Austin Blair of Michigan, for Pettit to serve in a newly formed Michigan regiment. Bio: Pettit, from Hudson (Lenawee County, MI), enlisted in Company B, 2nd Michigan Infantry as a Sergeant on May 10, 1861 at the age of 26. He was mustered on May 25, 1861. on Oct. 15, 1862, he was discharged due to a disability. Barden, also from Hudson, entered the service in the same unit as a 2nd Lt. on May 10, 1861 at the age of 27. He was commissioned on April 25, 1861 and mustered on May 25, 1861. He was commissioned as a 1st Lt. on Sept. 22, 1861, but resigned in 1862 to be commissioned as a Captain on Feb. 24, 1863. On Dec. 14, 1863, he was wounded in action at Granger's MIL He was mustered again on Feb. 14, 1864 and was wounded for second time on May 16, 1864. He was honorably discharged on June 6, 1864.

 

  • Pickett, George E. (George Edward), 1825-1875. Correspondence, 1861. 1 folder. Letter from Confederate Col. Pickett, Headquarters of the 21st Tennessee Volunteers in Columbus (Ky.), to Confederate Col. R. M. Russell, Commander of the 2nd Brigade. Dated Nov. 18, 1861, it describes orders delivered during the battle. Pickett reported 78 killed or wounded including 4 of 8 captains, five lieutenants, and that every mounted officer's horse was shot. Also mentioned are Confederate Brig. Gen. Pillow and Gen. Polk. There are also photocopies of their biographies. Other officers mentioned include Capt. R. J. Persons and Col. R. M. Russell. Bio: Pickett, a Confederate Brig. Gen., was from Va. He most remembered for Pickett's Charge. He surrendered at Appomattox. Pillow, a Confederate Gen. from TN, was a lawyer and Mexican War veteran. Twice wounded, he was appointed senior Maj. Gen. of TN When those troops transferred to the CSA, he was appointed Brig. Gen. of CSA in 1861. He fought at Belmont (Mo.) (Nov. 7, 1861) and suspended and reprimanded for leaving a junior officer to negotiate terms with General Grant. Polk, a Confederate Gen. and Episcopal bishop, occupied Columbus (Ky.) (Sept. 4, 1861) and defeated Grant at Belmont (Mo.) on Nov. 7, 1861. He was killed in action on June 14, 1864.

 

  • Pomeroy, Norman G. Pension certificate, 1875. 1 folder. (Photocopy) Pension certificate for Pomeroy, giving his service record and noting that his right leg had been fractured during the service. A photocopy of his service record is included. Bio: Pomeroy was from Manchester (Washtenaw County, MI). He enlisted and was mustered in Company K, 3rd Michigan Cavalry on Feb. 19, 1862. He was discharged for disability at Detroit (MI), on July 11, 1862.

 

  • Ransom, Ezra, 1837- Correspondence, 1862. 1 folder. Correspondence, Sept. 18, 1862, from Ransom to an unnamed friend, describing his sorrow at reading about dead comrades and thanking his friend for recommending him to the governor (probably for a promotion). His discharge and his disabled left wrist were also mentioned. There is also a photocopy of his service record. Bio: Ransom, from Owosso (Shiawassee County, MI), enlisted in Company B, 3rd Michigan Infantry on May 13, 1861 in Grand Rapids (MI) at the age of 24. He was mustered on June 10, 1861. On May 31, 1862​. he was wounded in action at Fair Oaks (Va.). He was discharged for disability at Detroit (MI) on Aug. 1, 1862.

 

  • Richmond, William H. Remiscences, [ca. 1910]. 1 vol., 2 typescripts. Civil War reminiscences, 1862-1865, describes his enlistment, training, troop movements, camp life, and military engagements in Virginia and North Carolina. Bio: Member of the 142nd Regiment, New York Infantry during the Civil War and later resident of Mt. Pleasant, Michigan.

 

  • Rinehart, Cyrus, 1846- Discharge Certificate, 1865, 1946. 1 folder. Notarized copy, 1946, of Rinehart's 1865 discharge certificate. The certificate gives his service history; physical description of age 19 (in 1865), five foot seven inches in height, with light hair, hazel eyes, dark complexion; and occupation as farmer. Bio: Rinehart enlisted on April 7, 1865 in the 182nd Ohio Infantry at the age of 19. He served until discharged on May 15, 1865.

 

  • Rix, Hiram, Jr., 1844- Papers, 1863, 1867. 1 v. (in 1 folder), IL Papers include a diary, Jan.-Dec. 1865 with accounts for 1863-1864 and 1866; a tintype of his sister, Hattie Rix; and a letter dated Dec. 4, 1867 to Hiram from C. Clark in the Treasury Dept., Washington D.C., about purchasing land. The letter is on Treasury Dept. letterhead. Also included is a photocopy of Rix's service record. The diary describes his life in a camp near Winchester (Va.) with drills; inspections; quartermaster business; rough weather; lack of water; marches to Harrisburg (PA), Petersburg (Va.), and Vicksburg (MS); pickets; battles; and Rebel deserters. Bio: Rix, from Meridian (Saginaw County, MI), enlisted in Company D, 6th Michigan Cavalry on Oct. 23, 1862 at Lansing (MI) at age 18. He was mustered on Nov. 11, 1862. On June 1, 1864, he was promoted to Corporal, was promoted to Sergeant on Nov. 1, 1864, and was promoted to Quartermaster Sergeant on Sept. 1, 1865. He was mustered out at Fort Leavenworth (Kan.) on Nov. 24, 1865. After the war ended, Rix marched to Fort Laramie (Wyo.) and fought Native Americans. He later lived in Leroy (Osceola County, MI)

 

  • Rogers, Alonzo Romeyn. Papers, 1861, 1885. 1 folder, IL Papers, include a partial diary, dated Oct.-Dec. 1861; a photograph, possibly a tintype, of Rogers in uniform; letters to/from friends and family, dated Feb. 11, 1862-Jan. 4, 1885; and an undated note about a slave sale. The note lists a boy, age 12 ($205), a woman, age 40, and a child, age 4 ($267), a woman and five children ($1,069), a woman ($220), and two man ($750). The correspondence includes a letter to "Dear Father," dated Feb. 22, 1862, from Alonzo in Somerset about news from home; a letter to "Dear Father" from Alonzo in Lexington (Ky.), dated Feb. 18, 1862, describing the fall of New Orleans (La.) and Savannah (Ga.), women helping soldiers in hospitals, and concerts to benefit the sick; a letter to "Dear Father" from Rogers in Nashville (TN), dated March 17, 1862, describing the scorn of citizens for soldiers, that he visited the Capitol, saw Andrew Johnson, Gen. Thomas, and Col. Steedman, sketched forts, and needed shirts; a letter to Mr. Rodgers from Fred Dahn, Co. E, 2nd Kentucky Regiment from a camp on the battlefield of Pittsburg Landing (TN), from April 18, 1862, about the battle; a letter to "Sister" from Alonzo in a camp opposite Chattanooga (TN), dated Nov. 6, 1863, describing rain, homesickness, constant skirmishes, food, and leaving for Bridgeport; a letter to "Friend Nellie" from Rogers in Louisville (Ky.), dated July 17 and 19, 1864, about more Rebels, constructing forts, and expecting an invasion. There are two undated Civil War letters to "Dear Father" from Rogers, one from Philippi (WV), dated June 21, 186-, about food rations and one dated June 21, 186-, also from Philippi (WV), Headquarters, 14th Regiment, OVM (Ohio Volunteer Militia?), about the regiment taking Rebel prisoners and losing Ohio men as prisoners of war. There is also a letter to "Friend Nellie," dated January 6, 1864 from D. W. Persons, Co. D., 4th Ohio Volunteer P. (Patrol?), 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 15th Artillery Corps, about memories and Bridgeport. Letters after the war include those from Mrs. Eliza B. Kimball, Columbus (Ohio), dated May 25, 1873, to Alonzo about the death of his father; a letter to Alonzo in Toledo (Ohio) from H. R. Lyle in Titusville (PA) dated April 26, 1875, about land for sale; and a generic letter from Alonzo to his unamed son, dated Jan. 4, 1885, on letterhead of the Toledo Electric Company with Rogers listed as Superintendent. Bio: Rogers was an officer in the 14th Ohio Infantry during the Civil War and Superintendent of the Toledo Electric Company after the war.

 

  • Rowley, Nathan, 1840- Discharge Certificate, 1865. 1 folder. Discharge certificate for Rowley, dated June 26, 1865, listing his service record; physical description as five-foot- eight-inches tall, with light complexion, eyes, and hair; and the occupation of farmer. There is also a photocopy of Rowley's service record. Bio: Rowley, born in Armada (Macomb County, MI), enlisted and was mustered in Company B, 22nd Michigan Infantry at Pontiac (MI) on Sept. 1, 1864 at age 19. He was mustered out at Nashville (TN) on June 26, 1865. After the war, he lived in Capac (MI).

 

  • Ryan, John. Reminiscences, 1905. 3 folders. Reminiscences, ca. 1905, includes a copy, photocopy, and transcript of the original manuscript. Relates Ryan's Civil War experiences, Dec. 1, 1863-1866. Described are the capture of C. S. Bell in TN, Fort Pillow, fighting, officers, marches to Memphis and Union City (TN), fighting the 4th Missouri Cavalry, marching to Kentucky, Colliersville and Memphis (TN), smallpox, measles, pay, clothes, Negroes fleeing top the U.S. Army, and his officers. Bio: Ryan, from Wanda (IL), served from 1861-1866 in the 2nd Illinois Cavalry, Company D.

 

  • Slaven, George C. Diaries, 1864, 1865. 1 Folder. Diaries, Jan. 1, 1864-July 24, 1865, briefly and daily note the weather, marching, picket duty, deaths and a funeral of comrades, fighting Rebels, and various locations in Virginia where the company marched to, fought at, or camped during the war, including Spotsylvania. On Oct. 21, 1864 the battalion escorted Gen George A. Custer. Also included are photocopies of relevant pages from the regimental history. Bio: Slaven enlisted on Jan. 15, 1863 in Company B of the 18th Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, part of the 1st Brigade, 3rd Division Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac. He was discharged by General Order on July 21, 1865. His hometown is listed as Greenwood Township (Crawford County, PA) in the diary. An Andrew W. Slaven, possibly a brother, enlisted in the same company and also survived the war.

 

  • Smith, Delivan, 1844-1916. Papers, 1862, 1916. 1 folder. Papers (mostly photocopies), 1862-1916, include his notes about Andersonville Prison, where he was imprisoned from May 12, 1864-June 2, 1865; a photocopy of his service record; and his obituary. The obituary notes that he was one of 100 men in his company to survive the Battle of Spotsylvania and one of ten in the company to survive the Prison. The ten survivors were swapped from the Prison in a prisoner exchange on June 2, 1865 and placed on the steamer, Sultana, which was blown up shortly thereafter, killing over 1600 men. Smith regained consciousness as the steamer was sinking and deserted. He survived by jumping into the river and hanging onto a floating tree. He was rescued five miles downstream and returned to Memphis and placed in a military hospital. His nine comrades were killed in the explosion. He was later transported to Columbus (Ohio) and Jackson (MI). On July 20, 1865, he was mustered out of service in Detroit (MI). Bio: Delivan Smith was born at Onondaga (NY) on Dec. 6, 1844. He moved to White Pigeon (MI) in 1860. He enlisted in Company H, 17th Michigan Infantry on Dec. 25, 1862 at age 18. He was mustered three days later. On May 12, 1864, he was taken prisoner at Spotsylvania (Va.) and imprisoned at Andersonville Prison. His official record says he was mustered out at Detroit on June 2, 1865. He married Marrilla Weatherwax, in White Pigeon, on Dec. 6, 1870. They later resided in Grand Traverse County and Grayling.

 

  • Smith, Joseph Rowe, 1802-1868. Family Papers, 1823, 1920. 1.5 cubic ft. (in 3 boxes), IL Family papers, 1823-1920 and undated, include the papers of Joseph Rowe Smith, Jr. with his promotion papers, photographic images, and his medical writings. Also, the writings of Joseph Rowe Smith, Sr., include his diary detailing his military career and other topics, 1823-1835. There is correspondence from Henry Smith to his brother, Joseph R. Smith, Sr., 1830-1849; miscellaneous papers of Horace Smith; and miscellaneous family history papers. There are also 44 early photographic images of the Smith family. The Clarke also has an oversized, framed painting of Joseph Rowe Smith, Sr. Bio: Joseph Rowe Smith, Sr. (1802-1868) was a U.S. Army Brigadier General. During the Civil War, he served as the military commander of Detroit with the rank of Lt. Colonel. Smith, Sr. was breveted as a Brigadier General by the close of the war. One son, Joseph Rowe Smith, Jr. (1831-1911?), served as a surgeon. Captured by Confederate troops while working at an Army hospital in May 1861. Smith, Jr., a doctor, was later released. Eventually, he was promoted to Surgeon General and Medical Director of the U.S. Army in 1865. He was twice breveted, once for meritorious service and once for superior ability and excellent management of his children. Smith, Sr.'s younger brother, Henry W. Smith, served as an Assistant Adjutant General during the Civil War and died as a Brevet Lt. Colonel at Fort Stanton (New Mexico) in 1869. Finding aid available.

 

  • Snyder, John G., 1832- Discharge Certificate, 1865. 1 folder. Discharge certificate for 1st Sgt. Snyder with his service record; place of birth; and physical description of five-foot- nine-inches tall with a light complexion, blue eyes, brown hair; and the occupation of carpenter. The certificate is extremely faded and difficult to read. There is also a photocopy of his service record. Bio: Born in Otsego County (NY), Snyder enlisted in Company C, 2nd Michigan Cavalry as a Corporal on Sept. 2, 1861 at age 29, in Grand Rapids (MI). He was mustered on Oct. 2, 1861 and he re-enlisted on Jan. 5, 1864 at Mossy Creek (TN). He was again mustered on March 29, 1864. On Jan. 5, 1864 he was promoted to 1st Sgt. He was commissioned as a 2nd Lt. on July 31, 1865. On Aug. 17, 1865, he was mustered out at Macon (Ga.).

 

  • Spears, William. Diary, 1864. 1 folder. Diary, Jan.-Dec. 1864, describes the weather, grazing and guarding of horses, camp life near Searcy (Ark.), comrades captured and killed in action, serving on picket duty, and troop movement. The diary was probably written by William Spears. Bio: Spears was from Oriskany Falls (NY). He did not serve in a Michigan unit during the Civil War.

 

  • Sprague, Wells, 1835- Discharge Certificate, 1865. 1 folder. Discharge certificate for Sprague which gives his service record; place of birth; and physical description of five- foot-seven-inches, light complexion, blue eyes, brown hair; and the occupation of farmer. A photocopy of Sprague's service record is included. Bio: Sprague was born in Onadagua (NY). He enlisted in Company A, 4th Michigan Cavalry on Aug. 11, 1862 at Detroit at the age of 27. Milan (MI) was listed as his hometown. He was mustered on Aug. 28, 1862 and promoted to Corporal on Oct. 6, 1863. On July 1, 1865, he was mustered out at Nashville (TN).

 

  • Stevens, George A., 1845- Enlistment Certificate, 1863. 1 folder. Enlistment certificate, dated Oct. 1863. He was listed as a farmer, age 18. There is also a photocopy of his service record. Bio: Stevens enlisted in Battery K, Michigan Artillery on Dec. 15, 1863 at Kalamazoo (MI), at age 18 and was mustered on Dec. 15, 1863. He joined the battery in Nashville (TN) on Feb. 24, 1864 and was mustered out at Detroit (MI) on July 22, 1865.

 

  • Stowe, Frederick A., 1834- Correspondence, 1863. 1 folder. Letter to Stowe, dated Jan. 4, 1863, from Mary B. and John Lindsay describing the prices of wood, weather, their health, news of friends, the governor postponing the draft, and Lt. James Bennett. There are also photocopies of Stewart's and Bennett's service records. Bio: Stowe, from Pewamo (Ionia County, MI), enlisted as a 2nd Lt. in Company B, 3rd Michigan Infantry in 1861 at age 27. He was commissioned as a 1st Lt. on Jan. 1, 1862 and as a Captain on Oct. 25, 1862. He was mustered on Dec. 8, 1862 and resigned as disabled on Feb. 27, 1863. Bennett, of Grand Rapids (MI), enlisted and was mustered as a Sergeant in Company B, 3rd Michigan Infantry on June 10, 1861 at age 20. He was commissioned as a 2nd Lt. on Oct. 25, 1862, mustered again on Jan. 25, 1863, and discharged on Oct, 12, 1863.

 

  • Sutter, Victor, Jr. Letter of Feb. 26, 1865 from Sutter on Johnson's Island to his younger brother, Johnnie Sutter in Detroit (MI), noting Johnny's last letter, studies, and "Killing rebels by the dozen." In the Isaac Spackman Family Papers. Bio: Sutter enlisted Aug. 8, 1862 at age 19 in Company A, 24th Michigan Infantry. He was mustered five days later. On July 1, 1863, Sutter was wounded at Gettysburg. He was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps on April 15, 1864 and discharged on July 10, 1865 at Cincinnati from Company E, 6th Veteran Reserve Corps.

 

  • Thompson, Stephen W., 1843- Papers, 1865. 1 folder. Papers, include an 1865 diary, display copy of his discharge record, and a copy of service record. The diary describes army life in a camp near Winchester (Va.); picket duty; Rebel prisoners; Rebel soldiers frozen to death; destruction of railroads, bridges, and mills around Charlottesville (N. Car.). Larger entries depict farm life near Davisburg (Oakland County, MI). His discharge certificate provides his service record and mentions his brother, John Thompson, who enlisted in Company K of the Michigan 5th Cavalry. Bio: Thompson, from Oakland County (MI), enlisted in Company B, 5th Michigan Cavalry on Aug. 20, 1862 at Springfield (Oakland County, MI) at age 20. He was mustered on Aug. 27, 1862, promoted to Corporal, taken prisoner at Falmouth (Va.) on Aug. 23, 1863, released on Oct. 1, 1863, and mustered out of service at Fort Leavenworth (Kan.) on June 20, 1865.

 

  • Truesdell, Henry J., 1833- Correspondence, 1863. 1 folder. Letter (photocopy) by Truesdell, while camped in Laurel (Md.), to his "Dear Niece" Clara [Mar?], dated June 20, 1863. He wrote that the government needed protection from Copperheads and cowards and in general about the "Old Flag", and the Rebellion. There is also a photocopy of his service record. Bio: Clara was a school teacher. Truesdell enlisted in Company A, 16th Michigan Infantry at Ontonagon (MI) at age 28. He was mustered on Sept. 17, 1871 and discharged as disabled in Washington, D.C. on Oct. 12, 1862.

 

  • Tyler, Henry G., 1844- Correspondence, 1864. 1 folder. Letter by Tyler in Welton (Iowa), dated March 19, 1864, to "Friend Stafford" describing how Rebel sympathizers interfered with his trip to Quincy (MI), Elkhart (Ind.), and Rock River (IL). There is also a copy of Tyler's service record. Bio: Tyler enlisted in Company C (reorganized), 3rd Michigan Infantry on October 9, 1864 at Bushnell Township (Montcalm County, MI) at age 20. He deserted at Green Lake (Tex.) on July 13, 1865.

 

  • Van Ostran, Clare E. Diary, 1864. 1 folder. Diary, Jan. 1-Aug. 16, 1864, describes camp life near Roandy Station (Va.), his duties and meals, the enlistment of new men, drunkenness and gambling among the soldiers, the weather, and fighting battles in Wilderness (Va.). Miscellaneous financial accounts continue through Dec. 1864. Bio: Van Ostran, from Hartford Center (Van Buren County, MI), was a Corporal in Company C, 70th New York Volunteers or the 1st Regiment Excelsior Brigade, 2nd Division, 3rd Corps, Army of the Potomac. He was mustered in July 1864.

 

  • Van Vleck, Henry L. Papers, 1861, 1862. 1 folder. Papers, include: picket pass for Headquarters 47th Regiment, New York Volunteers, Fort Edisto St., dated April 27, 1862, and signed by Col. Henry Moore; a letter from Van Vleck on board the Roanoke (Steamship) off Annapolis (Md.), dated Oct. 19, 1861, to 'Dear Parents and Friends," which describes sleeping on deck, the food, his dislike of the Irish Brigade which fights a lot, and waiting for his pay; and a letter to Van Vleck from James L. Smith, Capt., Co. D, 47th, Headquarters 47th Regiment, New York Volunteers, at Camp Moore, Hilton Head (S. Car.), dated Nov. 18, 1861, recommending his promotion from Sergeant to Lieutenant. Bio: From Augusta (Kalamazoo County, MI), Van Vleck served in the Sherman Battery or Company D, 47th New York Volunteers or Infantry.

 

  • Vandeventer, Herman L., 1840- Correspondence, 1862. 1 folder. Letter, dated April 26, 1862, from Vandeventer in Camp Cameron (Washington, D.C.) to Louise M. Caple and cousin Henry in Italy Hollow. The letter describes how Herman was just paid two months pay and is owed to more months pay, how marching orders are "counter mandid," the death of soldiers from smallpox, and that he is homesick. There is also a photocopy of his service record. Bio: Vandeventer enlisted in Company E, 2nd Michigan Infantry on April 17, 1861 in Niles (MI) at age 21. he was mustered on May 25, 18861. From Jan. 30- April 9, 1864, he served in Company E, 17th Michigan Infantry. On July 21, 1864, he was discharged at Detroit (MI).

 

  • Wadsworth, Albert O., fl. 1850-1901. Account and Journal Books, 1850, 1901. 7 v. Account and journal books, 1850-1901. V.1 (1850-1861) has addresses of Lt. Henry (Harry) S. Wadsworth of the United States Colored Troops, 65th. V.2 (1861-1865) has accounts, 1861-1864, and journal entries, July 6, 1861-July 5, 1865. V.3 (1861-1864) has accounts of Harry Wadsworth's U.S. bonds for Civil War service. Bio: Henry was probably a white officer in the USCT. Albert was a farmer.

 

  • Walton, Jasper S., 1846- Discharge Certificate. 1864. 1 folder. Honorable discharge certificate for Walton from Company E, 142nd Ohio National Guards, dated Sept. 1864. It states that he was from Tuscasarvas County (Ohio), that he enrolled in Company E, 142nd Ohio National Guards on May 13, 1864, and was discharged on Sept. 2, 1864 at Camp Chase (Ohio). Also, a history of the 142nd Ohio National Guards. Bio: In 1864, Walton was 18 years old with a dark complexion, gray eyes, dark hair, and employed as a farmer. Company E, Ohio National Guards was mustered in at Camp Chase (Ohio) on May 12, 1864 and mustered out on Sept. 13, 1864 in battle.

 

  • Warden, Selina. Papers, 1856-1869. Includes letters, 1862-1865, from her brother, Benjamin Clark, who served in Company H, 1st Michigan Cavalry. Brief inventory.

 

  • Watson, Amasa B. Family Papers, 1854-1932, undated. Includes: General Orders, 1861; correspondence re: Amasa B. Watson G.A.R. Post No. 395, and a carte-de-visite of Amasa in his uniform. The Amasa B. Watson G.A.R. Post No. 395 and Amasa B. Watson Woman's Relief Corps, both of Grand Rapids (MI) were named in his honor. Bio: Watson (1836-1888) was a wealthy businessman. He was commissioned a Major in the 8th Michigan Infantry, a unit he raised, on Aug. 19, 1861. Shot through the thigh on Jan. 1, 1862, he resigned on Sept. 10, 1862, receiving an honorable discharge. Finding aid.

 

  • Wattles, Victor C., 1843- Correspondence, 1865. 1 folder. Correspondence includes a letter from Wattles in Fort Leavenworth (Kan.), dated June 1, 1865, to "Friend Jasper" wishing they could be together, describing his plans to visit Salt Lake City (Utah), the lack of during the trip, the desertion of about one hundred soldiers in Kansas, and that he traveled from Alexandria (Va.), through Washington, D.C., Blodensburg, took a steamer to Saint Louis (Mo.) and then traveled to Leavenworth (Kan.). There is also a photocopy of his service record. Bio: Wattles enlisted in Company L, 7th Michigan Cavalry on Feb. 28, 1865 at Battle Creek (MI) and was promoted to Corporal on May 1, 1865. He was mustered out at Fort Leavenworth (Kan.) on Dec. 8, 1865.

 

  • Whitney, J. C. Diary, 1862, 1863. 1 folder. Diary, Sept. 15, 1862-April 22, 1863, includes an account of his travel from Rockford (IL) to a military camp south of Cincinnati (Ohio) and then to a permanent camp near Danville (Ky.). He describes camp life, dress parades, inspections, skirmishes, fights, being surrounded by Rebels south of Nashville (TN), having received a present from Mary J. Whitney, and a delicious Thanksgiving dinner. Bio: Whitney was from Lake Zurich (Lake County, IL) and served in Company C, 96th Illinois Volunteers.

 

  • Wilkins, William D., 1827-1882. Diary, 1862. 1 vol. [photostat of typescript]. Later illustrated diary of Wilkins' imprisonment, August 12-Sept. 26, 1862, describing daily life, prison conditions, and inhumane treatment of prisoners. Bio: Prominent Detroit (MI) citizen; Captain and Assistant Adjutant General, U.S. Volunteers, under General Alpheus Williams; and prisoner at Libby Prison in Richmond (Va.).

 

  • Wise, Mahala E. Correspondence, 1864. 1 folder. Letter from Wise at Headquarters, 1st Brigade, 2nd Cavalry Division, Cavalry Corps, dated July 25, 1864, to "Dear Chester" about living in a camp near Petersburg (Va.?) and sick friends. Bio: There is no information available on Wise or Chester.

 

  • Yarick, John. Papers, 1854, 1864. 1 folder. Papers include: Two letters to "Dear Brother" (John) from his brother, Reuben Yarick, including one from Fort Monroe (Va.) Camp Hamilton, dated March 26, 1862, describing picket duty, Gen. Wool, and Rebel pickets. A second letter, dated April 23, 1865, from Reuben at Washington, D.C., to John, describes his fears and feelings about the assassination of President Lincoln and visiting the body in the White House. There are also two letters from a third brother, G.[eorge] W.[ashington] Yarick, to John, dated June 13 and August 15, 1864, at the U.S. Hospital, Hampton (Va.), about Reuben being wounded and hospitalized, hopes for peace, and the restoration of the Union. A photocopy of Reuben Yarick's service record is also included. Bio: Reuben Yarick enlisted in Company G, 1st Michigan Infantry as a Sergeant on July 2, 1861, at Jackson (MI), at age 25. He was mustered on July 13, 1861. He re-enlisted on February 17, 1864 as a Sergeant, at Beverly Ford (Va.), and was mustered in the next day. On June 3, 1864, he was wounded in action and transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps (VRC). He was discharged from Company B, 24th VRC at Washington, D.C., on July 28, 1865.

 

  • Young, Charles B., 1829-1864. Correspondence, 1864, 1865. 1 folder. Correspondence from Young, includes: a letter to "Dear Father, Wife and Children," dated Oct. 30, 1864, in Chattanooga (TN), describing a lack of tents and equipment; eating hardtack; traveling from Jackson (MI) to Indianapolis (Ind.), Louisville (Ky.), and Nashville (TN); men in his unit from Gratiot and Shiawassee Counties, and lots of Confederate prisoners of war. Letter "No. 2" from Nashville (TN), dated Nov. 8, 1864, describes a trip to Atlanta (Ga.) from Chattanooga (TN), burnt locomotives, devastated country, hopes that the war will end, and Young asks his wife to kiss his children daily. A note from Young in Nashville (TN), dated Dec. 7, 1864, describes good food, a skirmish, signs of campfires, many sick, and that all but two of his tentmates are hospitalized. His last letter to "Dear Family," dated Dec. 22, 1864, notes that his comrades drove Rebels father back, captured troops and artillery, were on night maneuvers, the battlefields were covered with dead and wounded soldiers, rain soaked supplies, and that he has been sick. The last letter is from John S. Young, Charles' brother, to "Dear Father," dated Feb. 28, 1865, and notes that he received Father's letter about Charles' death, his sorrow for Charles' wife (Elmira) and children, and that he will try to send money and get Charles' back pay. There is also a photocopy of Charles' service record. Bio: Charles Young enlisted in Company I, 23rd Michigan Infantry in Coe Township (Isabella County, MI) in 1864, at age 35. He was mustered on Sept. 22, 1864 and joined the regiment on Nov. 12, 1865. He died of disease in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 10, 1865, and was buried at the National Cemetery in Arlington (Va.).

 

  • Young, Nathan H., 1843-1863. Correspondence, 1861. One letter, from Young at Camp Bennett (sp?) to his "Dear Mother," dated Dec. 15, 1861, expresing concern over his father's enlistment and describing the lack of equipment, his pay, expenses, and the weather. There is also a photocopy of his service record. Bio: Young, from Kalamazoo County (MI), enlisted in Company F, 3rd Michigan Cavalry, on Sept. 10, 1861, at age 18. He was mustered on Oct. 12, 1861. On April 14, 1863, he died of disease at Lexington (Ky.) and was buried at the National Cemetery at Corinth (MS), Grave No. 2375.