Slavery
  • Chet (Union Soldier). Letter, 1861 Aug 7. 1 item (3 pages). Letter written to a "friend." Relates news of mutual acquaintances, rumors of unit reorganizations that would allow troops to return home, estimates total Confederate forces at 240,000, and rumors that many slaves are in the Confederate cavalry and are escaping. Bio: Served with the 2nd Michigan Infantry.

 

  • Collet Family. Family Papers, 1840, 1936. .75 cubic ft. (in 1 box). Family Papers, 1840- 1936 and undated, of the Collet and Hall families. Topics covered include: politics, the Civil War, and slavery. Bio: The Collet and Hall families were joined in 1851 through the marriage of Emma Hall and Stephen Collet. Finding aid available.

 

  • Crury, O.S. Letters, 1864 Mar. 2 items. Letters to wife and children describing the daily routine, negroes enlisting, a description of the area around Chattanooga, TN, and local women. Bio: Union soldier in the Civil War.

 

  • Hopkins, Mordecai L. Papers, 1855-1891, include letters by Hopkins about politics, 1855- 1860, slavery, 1857, letter to his wife, March 1862. Letters to Hopkins from William H. Drake and T. Eastman with general Civil War news. In Mordecai L. Hopkins Papers. Also partial letter from Ananias Worden about the draft agreement, 1863, letter to Mort from George H. Osgood about Rebels, undated. Bio: Drake served in Company A, 3rd Michigan Infantry. He was discharged for disability at Washington, D.C., on Jan. 13, 1863 at age 28. Hopkins was a Michigan Senator from Ottawa County, 1855-1856. No information available on Eastman or Osgood. Worden was a friend and post office special agent under Pres. Lincoln.

 

  • Le Conte, John Lawrence, 1825-1883. Family Correspondence, 1860, 1866. 1 folder. Four photocopied letters from and to Le Conte and his cousin, Mathilda (Tillie) Harden, later the wife of Sumner Stevens, in Macon (Ga.). Letters discuss politics, slaves, freedmen, economics of Southern life, and North versus South. There is also a copy of Le Conte's biography. Bio: Le Conte (1825-1883) was recognized at home and abroad as the greatest entomologist that America ever produced. He was married to Helen. His cousin, Mathilda Harden, married Sumner Stevens and lived in Macon (Ga.).

 

  • Rogers, Alonzo Romeyn. Papers, 1861, 1885. 1 folder, IL Papers, include a partial diary, dated Oct.-Dec. 1861; a photograph, possibly a tintype, of Rogers in uniform; letters to/from friends and family, dated Feb. 11, 1862-Jan. 4, 1885; and an undated note about a slave sale. The note lists a boy, age 12 ($205), a woman, age 40, and a child, age 4 ($267), a woman and five children ($1,069), a woman ($220), and two man ($750). The correspondence includes a letter to "Dear Father," dated Feb. 22, 1862, from Alonzo in Somerset about news from home; a letter to "Dear Father" from Alonzo in Lexington (Ky.), dated Feb. 18, 1862, describing the fall of New Orleans (La.) and Savannah (Ga.), women helping soldiers in hospitals, and concerts to benefit the sick; a letter to "Dear Father" from Rogers in Nashville (TN), dated March 17, 1862, describing the scorn of citizens for soldiers, that he visited the Capitol, saw Andrew Johnson, Gen. Thomas, and Col. Steedman, sketched forts, and needed shirts; a letter to Mr. Rodgers from Fred Dahn, Co. E, 2nd Kentucky Regiment from a camp on the battlefield of Pittsburg Landing (TN), from April 18, 1862, about the battle; a letter to "Sister" from Alonzo in a camp opposite Chattanooga (TN), dated Nov. 6, 1863, describing rain, homesickness, constant skirmishes, food, and leaving for Bridgeport; a letter to "Friend Nellie" from Rogers in Louisville (Ky.), dated July 17 and 19, 1864, about more Rebels, constructing forts, and expecting an invasion. There are two undated Civil War letters to "Dear Father" from Rogers, one from Philippi (WV), dated June 21, 186-, about food rations and one dated June 21, 186-, also from Philippi (WV), Headquarters, 14th Regiment, OVM (Ohio Volunteer Militia?), about the regiment taking Rebel prisoners and losing Ohio men as prisoners of war. There is also a letter to "Friend Nellie," dated January 6, 1864 from D. W. Persons, Co. D., 4th Ohio Volunteer P. (Patrol?), 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 15th Artillery Corps, about memories and Bridgeport. Letters after the war include those from Mrs. Eliza B. Kimball, Columbus (Ohio), dated May 25, 1873, to Alonzo about the death of his father; a letter to Alonzo in Toledo (Ohio) from H. R. Lyle in Titusville (PA) dated April 26, 1875, about land for sale; and a generic letter from Alonzo to his unamed son, dated Jan. 4, 1885, on letterhead of the Toledo Electric Company with Rogers listed as Superintendent. Bio: Rogers was an officer in the 14th Ohio Infantry during the Civil War and Superintendent of the Toledo Electric Company after the war.