On exhibit October 2015 - February 2016
in the Clarke Historical Library:

Coming Spring 2016

Native Treaties - Shared Rights

002-Treaty of Prarie Du Chien.jpg

Land. Rights. Education. These were some of the things affected when the United States and Native governments signed treaties. The documents created agreements that profoundly changed both the Federal Government and the Native tribes. Europeans gained perpetual right to the land they called the United States. In return Native Americans gained many guarantees, some granted for as long as the United States existed. Explore how land, rights, and education came together as indigenous people and the United States Government created the legal understanding that underlies today’s State of Michigan. [pictured is J.O. Lewis's Lithograph of the Prairie du Chien Treaty, 1825]

Clarke Historical Library's Fall 2015 Speaker Series


September 22: "Sweetie-licious Pies"

DeWitt resident Linda Hundt, author of Sweetie-licious Pies: Eat Pie, Love Life, is an award winning baker and author. S​he is also an extraordinarily successful entrepreneur who owns and operates the Sweetie-licious Bakery Café. Ms. Hundt will speak about her career in the pie business and bring samples of her delicious creations to share.

October 7: “My Mother Was A Story Whisperer”

Sue Ann Martin, retired dean of CMU’s College of Communication and Fine Arts and regular reviewer of children’s books on WCMU Radio will discuss the art of storytelling.

This presentation is made possible by the David M. and Eunice Sutherland Burgess Endowment.

October 13: “Angling in a Fool’s Paradise—The Arctic Grayling in Michigan”

Opening the Clarke Historical Library Fall exhibit, retired dean of Science and Technology Robert Kohrman will tell the story of this beautiful fish that was discovered in the mid-19th century and became extinct in the Lower Peninsula only 30 years later.

The opening reception for the exhibit is supported in part by the Croll Family Endowment.

October 22: "Theodore Roethke: Michigan Child - American Poet"

Pulitzer Prize winning poet Theodore Roethke (1908-1963) had deep roots in Michigan. Jeff Vande Zande, Professor of English at Delta College, and Annie Ransford, president of the Friends of Theodore Roethke, will discuss Roethke’s early life. Vande Zande will talk about the Roethke House in Saginaw and read from his novel, American Poet. Ransford will tell a story within a story about the Roethke boyhood home, now a museum.

November 12: "An Evening with Clarence Tuma"

Owner and chef of Mt. Pleasant’s fabled restaurant, The Embers , Clarence Tuma will share stories from his life and work, drawn from his recently published memoir, The One-Pound Pork Chop – A Recipe for Life, Love, Family & the American Dream.​

All presentations are free and open to the public. All begin at 7:00 p.m. in the Park Library Auditorium.  A reception in the Clarke Historical Library will follow each talk.