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Kulhavi Hall


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Opened: 2003
Cost: $33 Million (entire three-building project)
Capacity: 714 (entire three-building project)

In the fall of 2001, University officials announced plans for the construction of a new high rise residence hall project which would be built as an addition to the existing Towers complex, originally completed in 1969-70. The first new residence halls to be built by the University in over 30 years, the $33 million housing complex would add an additional 238,000 square feet to the existing complex. Plans for the project were created by architects at Design Plus in Grand Rapids. The Christman Company of Lansing, which constructed the original Towers project, received the contract for the new buildings as well as the $8 million in renovations planned for the existing dormitories.

Construction officially began with a groundbreaking ceremony in November 2001. The plans called for a large complex that would include space for 714 additional residents, classrooms, a technology center, and a workout room. A convenience store and a DVD/video game rental outlet were also included in the original designs. Parking facilities would be redesigned so that three separate parking lots would serve the housing complex, the main one leading to a circular drive bounded by two ponds. A new security system, comprised of 54 cameras and proximity readers on exterior doors, was also installed as part of the project.

As the additions to the Towers complex neared completion in the fall of 2003, the University announced the official names of the new buildings. Kesseler Hall, which had been named previously, would be joined by Kulhavi Hall (called Gold Hall during construction) and Campbell Hall (called Maroon Hall during construction). In September, as students moved into the new residence halls, the University held an official dedication ceremony. Trustees Campbell (served 1995-2007), Kesseler (served 1991-97), and Kulhavi (served 2002-09) were honored in front of around 300 CMU alumni and donors and President Michael Rao gave a speech.

That same month, residents of the Towers complex held a pep rally to encourage unity among the old and new buildings. Around 1,500 student residents gathered at the intramural fields in an event sponsored by the seven buildings that make up the Towers complex. The event not only encouraged closer ties between residents of different buildings, it also kicked off the annual year-long challenge between residents of those buildings.