Biographies

 

Items are listed alphabetically by individual.

Bailey, Francis.

Baxter, Albert. "Muskegon Pioneer Remnants." Vol. 26, (1895): 272-274.
Contains an account of Francis Bailey, a "halfbreed" Indian trader and doctor from Muskegon who moved with the Potawatomi to Pentwater.

Bawbese/Baw Bese.

Dewey, F. A. "Address at the Farmer's Picnic, Devils Lake, August 22, 1883." Vol. 7, (1886): 536-542.
This account explains several aspects of Potawatomi life, and includes short biographies of chiefs Mitteau and Bawbese.

Dodge, Mrs. Frank P. "Landmarks of Lenawee County." Vol. 38, (1912): 478-491.
This favorable sketch of the Potawatomi includes a short description of Chief Baw Bese.

Bennett, William.

Kelley, Edward S. "William Bennett." Vol. 30, (1906): 85-95.
Bennet was an Indian trader and the first white settler in western Michigan. He married a Potawatomi woman, and their children were granted land in the treaties of Saginaw, Chicago, and Tippecanoe.

Cushaway/Cush-ee-wee.

Haines, Blanche. "French and Indian Footprints at Three Rivers on the St. Joseph." Vol. 38, (1912): 386-397.
This account mentions Cushaway, a Potawatomi chief, in addition to Indian burial grounds and reports of grave excavations.

Hooker, John S.

"John S. Hooker of Lowell." Vol. 38, (1912): 61-64.
Hooker was a white man who was a friend of Che-na-go. Hooker was an interpreter who was popular with the Native Americans, who called him Cap-squa-itt, referring to his strident voice. He wrote a directory of the Odawa in Michigan and conducted a census. This document also contains a story of Wab-sha-gun and his son, Che-na-go, solving the murder of a white family, as well as the meaning of various Indian words.

"Injun Jim."

Case, James A. "Death & Burial of 'Injun Jim.' An Incident in the Lives of Two Alpena County Pioneers." Vol. 35, (1907): 73-77.
A man known only as "Injun Jim" died in Alpena county during the Civil War. Local women cared for him during his last sickness and then buried him in an unmarked grave along the river.

"Jack."

Lafever, Margaret. "Story of Early Day Life in Michigan." Vol. 38, (1912): 672-677.
Lafever's story includes the account of "Jack," a Canadian "halfbreed" who lived with Lafever's family after her father found him nearly dead.

Johnston, John.

Chapman, Charles H. "The Historic Johnston Family of the 'Soo.'" Vol 32, (1903): 305-353.
This biography is about John Johnston, an early settler of the Sault Ste. Marie area, and his family. Johnston married O-shaw-gus-co-day-way-qua, the daughter of Wa-bo-jeeg (White Fisher), a local chief. The document also contains a sketch of the life of Wa-bo-jeeg, five Native American legends, translations for some Ojibwe poetry, and a short history of the Ojibwe nation.

Kaw-baw-gam, Charles.

"Memorial Report - Marquette County." Vol. 33, (1904): 743 - 744.
Charles Kaw-baw-gam was the stepson of Shan-wa-non of the Ojibwe. Kaw-baw-gam was popular with local whites, and after his death at 104 years of age, they purchased a bronze statue for his Presque Isle grave.

Kishkorko.

(Entires for Kishkorko are listed chronologically)

Hull to Dearborn. December 28, 1807. Vol. 40, (1929): 240-241.
This letter explains that an Ojibwe man named Kish-cou-cough (Kishkorko) had killed a Frenchman around 1800 but eluded the law and become a fugative. This man's father, a highly respected Chief, had asked the government to pardon his son. Hull supports the idea, believing that such an act will help persuade the Ojibwe to ally with the Americans and not the British.

Miller, Albert. "Detroit in 1814." Vol. 13, (1888): 503-507.
Account of armed conflict in 1814 which took place between white settlers under General Cass and Ojibwe Indians under Chief Kish-kaw-ko (Kishkorko).

Trowbridge, Charles C. "Detroit, Past and Present: In Relation to its social and Physical Condition. A Paper read before the Historical Society of Michigan, By Charles C. Trowbridge, May 1864." Vol. 1, (1900): 379.
Contains information on Kishkaukon (Kishkorko, Ojibwe Chief from the Saginaw bay area) and a discussion of two other Indian men, who were tried and hung for the murder of a surgeon.

Whiting, J. L. "Dr. J. L. Whiting's Historic Sketch." Vol. 2, (1880): 460-462.
Dr. Whiting served as the post surgeon at the Saginaw United States Infanty Stockade in 1823. In this account of his experiences there, he describes (in detail) an Ojibwe council at Green Point that dealt with the murder of an Ojibwe man. The individual charged with the crime was Kishkawkaw (Kishkorko).

Williams, B. O. "Early Michigan. Sketch of the Life of Oliver Williams and Family." Vol. 2, (1880): 36-40.
This essay explains the overall friendly relationship that the Williams family enjoyed with the Saginaw area Ojibwe, including Kish Kor Co (Kishkorko).

Stewart, E. M. S., Mrs. "Incidents in the Life of Mr. Eber Ward, Father of Capt. E. B. Ward of Steamboat fame as related to Mrs. E. M. S. Stewart in the Summer of 1852." Vol. 6, (1884): 471-473.
Contains an account of the Ojibwe Chief Kishkaukau's brutality. (Kishkorko).

Jones, George N., Mrs. "Miss Emily Ward, Commonly known as Aunt Emily." Vol. 38, (1912): 581-589.
Describes an 1826 incident on the St. Claire River. Several Indian men, intending to free the Ojibwe Chief Kishkaawko (Kishkorko) from his Detroit jail cell, raided the settlement while all its men were away serving their militia duty. When Aunt Emily fought the Indians off with a broom, they continued onward to Detroit.

"A Visit with a Lady who knew Detroit as a Frontier Post." Vol. 14, (1890): 535-539.
Story of Kish-kaw-koo (Kishkorko, Ojibwe Chief from the Saginaw bay area), and his crime, capture and death. He had murdered a clerk of Judge Riley on the St. Clair River. Also, he committed suicide in his cell before his scheduled hanging.

Ford, Henry. "Historical Detroit." Vol. 10, (1888): 88-97.
Explains that Detroit's first gallows were erected specifically for the execution of an Indian named Kishkaukon (Kishkorko, Ojibwe Chief from the Saginaw bay area). However, he committed suicide in his cell before he could be hung.

Maconce, Francois.

Farrond, B. C. "Early History of St. Clair County." Vol. 17, (1890): 430-439.
Pages 432-433 of this account contain a biography of Francois Maconce, a Potawatomi chief from the Swan Creek-Salt River area. He became chief in 1816 and went to Kansas in 1830.

Marsac, Daniel.

Hooker, John S. "Daniel Marsac." Vol. 38, (1912): 60-61.
Marsac was a white trader who married an Odawa woman named Je-nute, then abandoned her for a white woman after the couple's child died after being sent to Detroit to be raised "properly."

Maungwudaus.

Little, Frank. "Early Recollections of the Indians About Bull Prairie." Vol. 27, (1896): 330-338.
Contains a sketch of Chief Maungwudaus, who traveled to Europe with George Catlin, and also met Henry Clay and Zachary Taylor.

Metean/Ne-ma-gin-as-wot

Dodge, Mrs. Frank P. "Landmarks of Lenawee County." Vol. 38, (1912): 478-491.
This favorable sketch of the Potawatomi includes a short description of Chief Metean or Ne-ma-gin-as-wot.

Mitteau.

Dewey, F. A. "Address at the Farmer's Picnic, Devils Lake, August 22, 1883." Vol. 7, (1886): 536-542.
This account explains several aspects of Potawatomi life, and includes short biographies of chiefs Mitteau and Bawbese.

Naw-gaw-nee, Peter.

Day, J. E. "Sketch of Peter Naw-gaw-nee, a Celebrated Indian of the Isabella County Reservation." Vol. 27, (1890): 328-329.
Naw-gaw-nee was present at the Battle of the Thames where Tecumseh died. He was a friend of Governor William Hull and was present at the Treaties of Detroit and Saginaw. He settled on the Isabella Reservation in 1864 and died in 1895. His wife left him and both of his sons died at early ages.

Noonday/Newequa Geezig

Van Buren, A. D. P. "Noonday, the Ottawa Chief. He Was in the Battle of the Thames, and Sees Col. R. M. Johnson Shoot Tecumseh, Whom He Carries Off the Battlefield." Vol. 10, (1888): 158-161.

Weissert, Charles A. "The Indians and the Trading Posts in the Northwest of Barry County, Michigan." Vol. 38, (1912): 654-672.
This history of the Potawatomi near Kalamazoo contains a sketch of their chief, Noonday, or Newequa Geezig, along with descriptions of their daily life.

Ohshawano, Edward.

Gilbert, Mrs. Thomas D. "Memories of the 'Soo.'" Vol. 30, (1906): 623-633.
Contains a biography of Edward Ohshawano, a chieftain of the Indians at Saulte Ste. Marie. It also contains a story of an Indian burial site which is now under the canals, as well as a sketch of Henry Rowe Schoolcraft's wife, who was also Native American.

Okemos/Ogemos.

Chatterton, M. D. "Indian Funeral Scene." Vol. 27, (1896): 338-340.
This account describes Okemos as a beggar, and recounts the funeral of Okemos' daughter in Ingham County.

Farrond, B. C. "Early History of St. Clair County." Vol. 17, (1890): 430-439.
Pages 433-434 of this account contain a biography of Okemos or Ogemos, who was a nephew of Pontiac who died in 1858 at over 100 years of age.

Jenison, O. A. "Paper by O. A. Jenison, Read February 5th, 1879." Vol. 3, (1881): 48-52.
Jenison presents to Pioneer Society of the State of Michigan with an ambrotype photograph of Chief Okemos. This paper is a detailed biography of Okemos, who fought with the British during the American Revolution, was a non-hereditary chief, and died in 1858.

Niles, M. J. "Old times in Clinton County." Vol. 14, (1890): 620-626.
Briefly discusses Okemos and the items which were buried with him in 1858.

Potter, Theodore. "A Boy's Story of Pioneer Life in Michigan." Vol. 35, (1907): 393-412.
Contains the author's telling of his experiences with Chief Okemos of Lansing, including Okemos' character and adventures hunting deer together.

Pecitiac.

Goodyear, Henry. "Indians of Barry County." Vol. 35, (1907): 637-643.
This character sketch of the Odawa and Potawatomi contains a short biography of Chief Pecitiac.

Pokagon.

Coolidge, Orville W. "Address at the dedication of the Boulder Marking the site of Fort St. Joseph." Vol. 39, (1915): 283-291.
Includes discussion of white missionaries' work with Indians, especially Chief Pokagon, whose complete written request for a missionary in 1831 is included.

Copley, A. B. "The Pottawattomies." Vol. 14, (1890): 256-267.
This brief history of the Potawatomi nation contains short biographies of several chiefs, includng Pokagon.

Girardin, J. A. "Life and Times of Rev. Gabriel Richard." Vol. 1, (1900): 493.
This essay contains a dialogue that took place in July of 1830 in which Chief Pokagon of the Potawatomi requested from Father Richard a resident missionary for his people.

Pontiac.

Headley, J. T. "Pontiac; or the Siege of Detroit." Vol. 21, (1892): 613-639.
This is the story of Pontiac's life, including a lengthy description of the siege of Detroit.

Riley, John.

Farrond, B. C. "Early History of St. Clair County." Vol. 17, (1890): 430-439.
Pages 434-437 of this account contain a biography of John Riley, an Ojibwe chief from Port Huron whose father was white. Riley is mentioned in Article 3 of the Treaty of Saginaw. He died in 1842.

"Rodd, Old Mother."

Farrond, B. C. "Early History of St. Clair County." Vol. 18, (1891): 430-439.
"Old Mother Rodd" was a Native American who was from the Port Huron area but was not Ojibwe. She was an expert in herbal medicine, lived on the Sarnia reservation, and died in 1870 at over 100 years of age.

Sagamaw.

Scott, A. H. "Indians in Kalamazoo County." Vol. 10, (1888): 163-166.
This account of the Kalamazoo reservations during the 1830s and 1840s contains a short biography of Chief Sagamaw.

Saugahash.

"Saugahash's Grave Marked by Three Rivers' Daughters of the American Revolution." Vol. 38, (1912): 400-401.
Saugahash was a Potawatomi chief who was killed by his own people for signing the treaty of removal in 1835.

Schoolcraft, Mrs. Henry Rowe.

Gilbert, Mrs. Thomas D. "Memories of the 'Soo.'" Vol. 30, (1906): 623-633.
Contains a biography of Edward Ohshawano, a chieftain of the Indians at Saulte Ste. Marie. It also contains a story of an Indian burial site which is now under the canals, as well as a sketch of Henry Rowe Schoolcraft's wife, who was also Native American.

Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe, to Anna Jameson. nd. Vol. 36, (1908): 95-100.
A letter containing a short biography of Schoolcraft's wife, the granddaughter of Chief Wau-bo-jeeg of the Chippewa. His wife, who is not named in the account, was born in 1800 and died in 1842.

Shavehead.

Copley, A. B. "The Pottawattomies." Vol. 14, (1890): 256-267.
This brief history of the Potawatomi nation contains short biographies of several chiefs, includng Shavehead.

Smith, Edwin S. "Pioneer Days in Kalamazoo and Van Buren." Vol. 14, (1890): 272-280.
This character sketch of the Potawatomi contains short biographies of chiefs including Shavehead.

Shon-e-kay-zhich/Little Jim Fletcher.

Gould, Lucius E. "The Passing of the Old Town." Vol. 30, (1906): 352-396.
Pages 367-370 of this account contains a sketch of Shon-e-kay-zhich or Little Jim Fletcher, a white captive raised as an Indian.

Skako.

Gould, Lucius E. "The Passing of the Old Town." Vol. 30, (1906): 352-396.
Page 358 of this account contains a sketch of Skako, a Native American chief.

Tanner, John.

Gilbert, Angie Bingham. "The Story of John Tanner." Vol. 38, (1912): 196-201.
Tanner was a "white Indian" who was suspected of killing Henry Rowe Schoolcraft's brother. He disappeared and was never again found. While Schoolcraft believed that Tanner was guilty, some sources say that a white army officer committed the crime.

Steere, Joseph H. "Sketch of John Tanner, Known as the 'White Indian.'" Vol. 22, (1893): 246-254.
Tanner was a white man who had been taken prisoner by the Ojibwe as a child. He served the US as an interpreter. He has the distinction of having a state law passed specifically preventing him from harming his daughter, subjecting him to fines or imprisonment. He disappeared after being suspected of killing James Schoolcraft in Sault Ste. Marie in 1846, but another man reportedly confessed to the crime on his deathbed. Tanner was never seen again.

Topinabee.

Copley, A. B. "The Pottawattomies." Vol. 14, (1890): 256-267.
This brief history of the Potawatomi nation contains short biographies of several chiefs, includng Topinabee.

Wabojeeg/White Fisher

Chapman, Charles H. "The Historic Johnston Family of the 'Soo.'" Vol 32, (1903): 305-353.
This account of the Johnston family contains a biography of Chief Wa-bo-jeeg, or White Fisher, whose daughter married John Johnston.