Skip navigation
 

More than 700 CMU students to present research and creative endeavors

More than 700 CMU students will present their research at the Student Research and Creative Endeavors Exhibition from 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 16, in Finch Fieldhouse.

Contact: CMU News


More than 700 Central Michigan University students will present their research at the Student Research and Creative Endeavors Exhibition from 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 16, in Finch Fieldhouse.

SRCEE enables undergraduate and graduate students to discuss their research with others and bring awareness to the groundbreaking work that CMU students and faculty are pursuing. The annual exhibition will feature nearly 400 research displays, computer and video demonstrations, case studies, internship experiences, and creative performances.

Bath senior Ian Milligan, a chemistry major in the honors program, is presenting his findings on the creation of a new molecule called a monomer. Milligan has been working with faculty member Wenjun Du to study methods of increasing the efficiency of the synthesis of this special sugar.

“These sugar monomers are essential pieces of the system that will allow nanoparticles to be loaded with medicine and targeted for delivery to specific tissues or tumors in the body,” Milligan said.

By targeting drugs at diseased tissues or cells in the body, unwanted and harmful side effects can be reduced, Milligan said.

In December 2013, results from Milligan’s work with Du were published in Angewandte Chemi International Edition, a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Wiley-VCH on behalf of the German Chemical Society.

“I give a lot of credit to the CMU Honors Program,” Milligan said. “It is what encouraged me to get involved with research and is how I met my professor.”

Three Rivers senior Hillary Karbowski will present her research at SRCEE for the second time in her academic career. Karbowski was named the Young Botanist of the Year in 2013 by the Botanical Society of America.

Her research is focused on looking at the variability in soil and water chemistry among prairie fens, a wetland community dominated by sedges, grasses and other graminoids.

“I am a strong believer that there are great benefits to presenting research as much as you can and to as many different audiences as you can,” Karbowski said. “It allows for students to feel comfortable speaking in front of people about their research, and most importantly, it’s a great learning opportunity. I believe SRCEE allows for that growth in students.”

SRCEE is sponsored by CMU’s Office of Research and Sponsored Programs and is free and open to the public. For more information visit http://cmich.ly/SRCEE.


Photo Associator

Article Photo Title

Photo Title required.

Photo for News Home

Select File
{{vm.homeFile.fileName}}
Upload
Use This One

Photo for News Feeds

Select File
{{vm.feedFile.fileName}}
Upload
Use This One