Teaching Feedback Framework

To provide transparency regarding what we look to observe in effective teaching practice, we provide you with the framework for our observations below. Non-evaluative observations are conducted using Garrison, Anderson & Archer’s (2000) Community of Inquiry (COI) framework by observing three presences: social, teaching, and cognitive. The COI framework, designed as a lens through which to view teaching and learning effectiveness, and allows educators to leverage the power of communities in the classroom.   

Social presence 

The ability to perceive others in a bi-modal environment as “real” and the projection of oneself as a real person. Social presence involves open communication, affective expression, and group cohesion.

Examples:
  • Projects a teaching persona through announcements, emails, videos
  • Offers optional virtual office hours for students
  • Creates weekly videos/announcements
  • Recaps learning content
  • Develops initial course activities (e.g., virtual breakouts sessions) to encourage development
  • Encourages students to share anecdotes, experiences, and beliefs in discussions
  • Designs collaborative activities, small group discussions

Areas within an asynchronous or synchronous session:

  • Announcement page
  • Email
  • Discussion board
  • Chat area of the session (e.g., WebEx, Microsoft Teams)

Cognitive presence

The extent to which learners construct and confirm meaning through sustained reflection and discourse. 
  • Identifies big ideas the instructor wants students to take away from the course and develop major course activities around the assessment of those activities.
  • Provides frequent opportunities for assessment and feedback
  • Uses self-testing, practice assignments
  • Provides multiple representations of the knowledge the instructor wants students to learn
  • Encourage experimentation, divergent thinking, and multiple perspectives.

Areas within an asynchronous or synchronous session:

  • Announcement page
  • Email
  • Discussion board
  • Facilitation during a live session (e.g., WebEx, Microsoft Teams)
  • Gradebook feedback
  • Assignment descriptions and directions
  • Instructional videos

Teaching presence

The design, facilitation, and direction of cognitive and social processes for the realization of meaningful learning. 

Examples:
  • Facilitates students’ learning activity within the asynchronous or synchronous discussion
  • Provides students with timely and supportive feedback
  • Provides students with explicit and redundant instructions for all course activities

Areas within an asynchronous or synchronous session:

  • Announcement page
  • Email
  • Discussion board
  • Chat area of the session (e.g., WebEx, Microsoft Teams)
  • Facilitation during a live session (e.g., WebEx, Microsoft Teams)
  • Gradebook feedback
  • Instructional videos
  • Assignment descriptions and directions

Adapted from a work by Huang, W., Hurt, A., Richardson, J.C., Swan, K. & Caskurlu, S. (2018).  Community of Inquiry Framework. Purdue Repository for Online Teaching and Learning. Licensed Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 International License.

Reference

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T, & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2,87–105.