Teaching Feedback in the Online Environment

The Office of Curriculum and Instructional Support offers Teaching Feedback opportunities for instructors who wish to gain valuable and timely student input that informs teaching practices at any point during the semester, including compressed formats. The Teaching Feedback process enables instructors to gauge the impact of teaching and student learning early on, so there is time to make adjustments in instructional methods, either in that course or in the future.  


As part of the Teaching Feedback process, instructors may participate in one or more of these services: 

  • Consultation - A one-on-one virtual meeting with a consultant to discuss specific methods, challenges, questions, or concerns related to your teaching practice.  
  • Observation - A 1-hour observation of your teaching practice in a remote/online course or during a synchronous session. 
  • Student Survey - An online survey invitation sent to your students via Blackboard announcement to collect their feedback on your teaching practice and their learning experience. 
  • Blackboard Review - A Blackboard review evaluates the syntax within a course shell for clarity, consistency, and accessibility. Recommendations are made to streamline navigation, increase course management efficiencies through the utilization of LMS tools, and ensure all aspects of the course are in sync. 
Before selecting any of the above services, please review the framework to learn more about the process, what you will gain as a result of participating, and what we ask from you as a participant. 

Request Teaching Feedback

Consultations 

What Does a Consultation Look Like?  

CIS staff offer consultations related to many facets of teaching, such as pedagogy and methodologies, instructional and curriculum design, educational technologies and media, best practices teaching in the online modality, and educator professional development, among other things.  

We provide consultations in various venues and formats to suit your needs and will consider other requests as necessary. Examples include:  

  • Virtual – Meet with us on WebEx, Microsoft Teams, or another virtual tool of your choosing.  
  • Telephone – Confer with us over the telephone.  
  • Email – Confer with us in written format.  
  • Virtual Small Group – Invite us into a development cohort, a department meeting, or another virtual setting if you'd like to start a dialogue on practice with a small group of educators.  
  • Pre- or Post-Consultation for Teaching Feedback – You can pair our consultation service with other teaching feedback services and data to maximize benefits. 

What Do We Believe is Effective Teaching Practice?  

To provide transparency regarding what we look to observe in effective teaching practice, we provide you with the framework for our observations. Non-evaluative observations are conducted using Garrison, Anderson & Archer’s (2000) Community of Inquiry (COI) framework by observing three presences: social, teaching, and cognitive. The COI framework, designed as a lens in which to view teaching and learning effectiveness, and allows educators to leverage the power of communities in the online classroom.  

Observation

What Does an Observation Look Like?  

We can observe a course or a synchronous (live) online session.  

Online Course: We may observe your teaching practices in an online course of your choice through postings on the announcement page, facilitation in the discussion forums, and feedback in the gradebook. Many educators teaching online make use of ready-to-teach content packages, so be aware that our feedback is not on fixed course design, but rather on the educator’s facilitation of that content package and experience for learners. If you seek feedback on online course design, please view our instructional design page

Synchronous Session: We may observe one-hour of your facilitation during a synchronous session (via Teams, WebEx).  

What Do We Believe is Effective Teaching Practice?  

To provide transparency regarding what we look to observe in effective teaching practice, we provide you with the framework for our observations. Non-evaluative observations are conducted using Garrison, Anderson & Archer’s (2000) Community of Inquiry (COI) framework by observing three presences: social, teaching, and cognitive. The COI framework, designed as a lens in which to view teaching and learning effectiveness, and allows educators to leverage the power of communities in the online classroom.    

Student Survey

What is a Student Survey?

We offer student surveys, or learner feedback collected by CIS staff via an online survey, to educators teaching in any location or format. These are generally posted in Blackboard along with the recommendation that educators discuss the survey and the importance of them to their learner (via synchronous sessions, email, announcement page).   

What Criteria Do We Survey?

To provide transparency regarding what we look to observe in effective teaching practice, we provide you with the framework for our observations. Non-evaluative observations are conducted using Garrison, Anderson & Archer’s (2000) Community of Inquiry (COI) framework by observing three presences: social, teaching, and cognitive. The COI framework, designed as a lens in which to view teaching and learning effectiveness, and allows educators to leverage the power of communities in the online classroom.        

Why Not Survey on the Same Criteria as the SOS/EOC?

This is a valid question, as some educators who consult with us hope to enhance student perception data on the student opinion surveys used at the Mt. Pleasant campus or the End-of-Course Surveys used online and offsite courses. We do not attempt to replicate those tools for several reasons. Most importantly, because those tools are already available to you, you've likely already received that feedback when you've taught previous sections of the class. You're welcome to request a consultation with us to talk about strategies for responding to SOS/EOC feedback. Our service is provided to aid your current term but is also extended to those who feel they want to collect additional data and perspectives to further inform practice. Thus, our framework assesses a broader set of criteria.  

Refer

Community if Inquiry. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://coi.athabascau.ca/coi-model/ 

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education model. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2-3), 87-105.