Applied Experience in Diversity

​​​Subgroup IV C: Studies in Racism and Cultural Diversity in the United States

 

Importance

Central Michigan University is committed to building student understanding of the basic forces, ideas, and values that shape the world. Upon graduation, students are expected to work effectively with others, including those of diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds, and to think reflectively about themselves as individuals and as members of society. Classroom-based courses designated as meeting criteria for inclusion in the University Program Subgroup IV C: Studies in Racism and Cultural Diversity in the Unites States focuses on enhancing student understanding and appreciation of racial differences. The focus is typically on building cultural awareness through an understanding of differences. 

 

Companies seek university graduates with training in racial diversity to help manage peer relations in the workplaces that are increasingly diverse and in corporations that operate internationally. Coursework in racism and cultural diversity educates people on how to conduct themselves when interacting with diverse groups of people. Many organizations are changing to become more inclusive. People who already have an inclusive mindset are likely to find the transition less difficult.


Corporations are aware that when diverse people interact, creativity ensues. People learn from those whose experiences, beliefs, and perspectives are different from their own. Understanding people from different backgrounds promotes the sharing of different ideas. As an example, the Dow Chemical website (dow.com) reports, "We value the differing experiences, backgrounds and perspectives our employees bring, and rely on those differences to fuel innovation."   

 

Because completing a course in this area is likely to increase your awareness pervasive stereotypes/misconceptions of racial differences, coursework in racism and cultural diversity can enhance a resume or graduate school application.

 

Written by Arisa C. Settles, CMU Student and Diversity Scholar

for The Multicultural and Diversity Education Council

 

 

A list of courses designated as meeting criteria for inclusion in Subgroup IV C: Studies in Racism and Cultural Diversity in the United States is available in the CMU Undergraduate Bulletin (https://bulletins.cmich.edu/)                                          

Applied Experiences

Central Michigan University recognizes the potential of for applied experiences to impart an understanding of racism and cultural diversity within the United States. Therefore, two options are available for meeting the requirement for Subgroup IV-C: Studies in Racism and Cultural Diversity within the United States:

Option 1: Complete at least three credits of study in a CMU faculty-led course that involves interacting with one or more of the major groups that experience both racism and invidious discrimination in the United States. To have the course count for credit in Subgroup IV-C: Studies in Racism and Cultural Diversity within the United States, the faculty member leading the seminar must have approval from the General Education Committee prior to the experience. Information on completing the application can be found on the General Education website (https://www.cmich.edu/office_provost/AcademicAffairs/gened/Pages/Applied-Experiences.aspx)

OR

Option 2: Complete three credits of applied coursework (e.g., internship, practicum, service-learning project) with one or more of the major groups that experience both racism and invidious discrimination in the United States. Students must sign up with a faculty member who oversees the experience and, after completing the course, submit the proposal for credit in Subgroup IV-C: Studies in Racism and Cultural Diversity within the United States for evaluation by the General Education Committee. Information on completing the application can be found on the General Education Program website (https://www.cmich.edu/office_provost/AcademicAffairs/gened/Pages/Applied-Experiences.aspx)