Admirable Achievements

The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), has granted accreditation to the following programs in the Department of Counseling and Special Education at Central Michigan University: Clinical Mental Health Counseling (M.A.), School Counseling (M.A.), and Addiction Counseling (M.A.). Accreditation was granted at sites in Mt. Pleasant, Southfield, and Grand Rapids. CACREP is the primary accreditation body for counseling programs in the United States. 

Accreditation ensures that an institute or program is reaching the required standard with respect to the quality of education they provide. CMU’s counseling programs met this standard and earned accreditation in July of 2021. The current counselor licensure law in Michigan requires students to graduate from CACREP accredited programs; or complete a degree that mirrors CACREP standards to be licensed in the State of Michigan. As a result, this accreditation makes it easier for CMU graduates to become licensed, and thus practice in Michigan.  

While accreditation was awarded in 2021, any student from 2019 and forward who graduated with a degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling, School Counseling, or Addiction Counseling may also be considered a CACREP graduate. This achievement is a result of the efforts made by faculty in the Department of Counseling and Special Education. Because of their hard work and determination, CMU’s counseling program was able to meet the standards set out by CACREP, earn accreditation, and ultimately benefit the students. 


The CMU Counseling program is full of opportunities and will offer its first-ever online program in Fall 2022. Students will have the flexibility to explore their passions and broaden their knowledge all from a remote setting.  

 

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For more information contact Sheri Pickoverpicko1s@cmich.edu. 

 

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Story by ORGS intern Hailey Nelson