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Accommodations

Explanation of accommodations

Whether you have a permanent or temporary disability, we are here to provide reasonable and appropriate accommodations. After you've registered with our office and submitted documentation from a qualified professional, we will review the documentation and set up a meeting with you to learn more and determine any accommodations based on your individual situation. Once you've qualified for an accommodation, it's up to you to decide if and how you'll use it. Here are some samples of possible accommodations.

  • Typically time-and-a-half (1.5x) or double-time (2x) in rare instances. 
  • Does not apply to take-home tests. 
  • Students wishing to use this accommodation must make arrangements AT LEAST 3 BUSINESS DAYS IN ADVANCE to allow for adequate preparation time.
  • For on-campus face-to-face courses, students should contact the CMU Testing Center at 989-774-1092.
  • For online or remote courses, students should contact their instructor. 
  • Provided by the instructor or CMU Testing Center. If provided by the instructor, the quiet area should be in a location of minimal distraction and in which the student can remain throughout the test.
  • Software that is loaded onto the student's equipment and can provide a reading alternative for texts and exams. Student Disability Services may provide equipment if needed. It is the student's responsibility to ask for training on the text-to-speech software before exams in order to be prepared to use this technology during the test.

     

  • Students approved for this accommodation may have to take exams in a separate location from their class, which means access to professors for questions may be limited or not available. Students should ask about this on a case-by-case basis if they are concerned.

     

  • Students who have been granted a reading technology accommodation through Student Disability Services are also eligible to receive textbooks they own in an electronic version compatible with screen-reading software.

     

  • Software that is loaded onto the student's computer, tablet and/or smartphone to digitally record lectures.
  • Students may require preferred seating for recording.
  • Recordings are for personal use and may not be distributed to others.
  • Accessible tables are available for those students using wheelchairs or needing adjustable classroom seating.

  • Allowed if required for needed technology such as reading software or speech-to-text software.
  • If the student's or SDS's computer is used, internet access will be disconnected during the exam.
  • Students approved for this accommodation may have to take their exams in a separate location from their class, which means access to professors to ask questions may be limited or not available. Students should ask about this on a case-by-case basis if they are concerned.
  • Preferred seating may be approved for certain circumstances based on consultation with SDS staff.

      Accommodations in college vs. high school

      Some accommodations which may have been granted in the high school environment are generally not appropriate or suitable for a collegiate environment.

    • Generally not appropriate in higher education, although on occasion individual instructors do provide study guides.
    • Studying efficiently and effectively is an acquired skill. Check out the Office of Student Success resources to learn how to manage your time better, prepare for exams, learn study tips, and much more!
    • Considered an alteration of an essential element of a course so is not allowed by Student Disability Services. 
    • Given the condensed nature of college courses as compared to high school (16 weeks vs. year) timing of assignments, papers, projects, etc. is extremely important. Allowing an extension on a paper will likely overlap with the start of other coursework, which would in turn further delay the student's ability to complete that assignment and perhaps the course.
    • A student with a disability should discuss this with their instructor. Some are open to extensions on a limited basis; others are not.
    • Students having difficulty meeting deadlines can utilize the services of an academic advisor to learn better time management or may decide to reduce the course load with the understanding that time to graduation will be extended.
    • Considered an alteration of an essential element of a course so is not allowed by Student Disability Services.
    • The student may discuss with their instructor if any of these are a possibility.
    • Help is available to all CMU students through the various centers and Tutoring.
    • Generally considered fundamental alterations of a course and are not allowed by Student Disability Services.
    • Minor changes such as "no scantrons" are allowed, but such changes cannot interfere with the content that the instructor is trying to assess.